Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

Ways to Connect

NOAA Okeanos Explorer Program/2013 Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has proposed the first-ever national monument in the Atlantic Ocean. The designation would protect three deep-sea canyons off the coast of southern New England, and a chain of mountains, Cashes Ledge, in the Gulf of Maine. NOAA is holding a town hall meeting to discuss the proposal tomorrow night.

Photo Courtesy of Peter Green

In Bristol this weekend, live owls, hawks, and other birds of prey will take center stage at the Audubon Society’s Environmental Education Center. The annual event Raptor Weekend will also feature photographs by a local bird photographer.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Nearly three years after Superstorm Sandy, some Rhode Island residents are still dealing with the aftermath. And it’s not just damage to buildings and property. These Rhode Islanders are struggling with mental illness related to stress. 

Courtesy of Brown University

The number of days with temperatures over 80 degrees has gone up by nearly a third. That's the latest finding of a new Brown University study.

Lia McLaughlin / U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Work is underway to remove the White Rock Dam on the Pawcatuck River, along the Rhode Island/Connecticut border.The dam was built in 1940.

The White Rock Dam is located seven miles from the mouth of the Pawcatuck River, near Westerly and Stonington, Ct. Dams have restricted its flow since before the American Revolutionary War. The current dam stands six feet tall and more than 100 feet long. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The head of the Environmental Protection Agency made a stop in Rhode Island on Tuesday to discuss federal initiatives on climate change. The meetings included Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza and about 20 business leaders.

RIPR File Photo

Rhode Island’s clean energy sector supports nearly 10,000 jobs, according to a new report from the state’s Office of Energy Resources. The report is based on surveys of more than 650 businesses.

Wikimedia Commons

Students in Newport will learn tips during the new school year on how to stay out of harm’s way when they walk and bike to school.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

A group of local science teachers got to see science in action aboard a research cruise this summer. They worked with scientists from the University of Rhode Island.

Westerly residents are asking the town council to drop or modify a consent agreement it signed last year with the owner and tenants of a controversial quarry. 

Charges will mostly likely be dismissed for two climate activists, who were arrested earlier this month in Burrillville. They chained themselves to the front gate of a Spectra Energy facility to protest plans for an expansion.

Courtesy of U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

Fisheries managers and conservationists are concerned about this year's sharp drop in migrating river herring at most river runs in the state. Some areas saw declines of more than 80 percent.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Federal fisheries officials will work with coastal states including Rhode Island over the next year to ease the impact of climate change on marine resources. The fisheries division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has outlined a new strategy, which will guide regional action plans it will finalize by the end of 2016.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Fishermen in the Gulf of Maine have been harvesting lobsters at record highs. That’s in contrast to fishermen in Southern New England, where there has been a sharp decline in the lobster population since the late 1990s. 

Courtesy of Steve Dubois

The Connecticut-based company operating a controversial quarry in Westerly has voluntarily shut down. The quarry has been a source of frustration for residents, who have complained about dust and noise pollution.