Ambar Espinoza

Environmental Reporter

Ambar Espinoza’s roots in environmental journalism started in Rhode Island a few years ago as an environmental reporting fellow at the Metcalf Institute for Marine & Environmental Reporting. She worked as a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio for a few years covering several beats, including the environment and changing demographics. Her journalism experience includes working as production and editorial assistant at National Public Radio, and as a researcher at APM’s Marketplace.

Espinoza joins Rhode Island Public Radio most recently from Seattle, WA, where she earned a master of education with a focus on science education from the University of Washington. She earned her bachelor’s degree in political science from American University in Washington, D.C. Espinoza was born in El Salvador and raised in Los Angeles, CA.

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RIPR File

The Environmental Protection Agency has awarded Rhode Island five grants totaling more than a million dollars to clean up contaminated properties across the state.

The money will help with the cleanup of contaminated sites in the cities of Central Falls, Pawtucket, and Providence.

John Bender / RIPR

Upper Narragansett Bay is cleaner than it used to be. That’s according to the latest data from the Narragansett Bay Commission.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Energy company Invenergy plans to build a natural gas-fired power plant in Burrillville. Governor Gina Raimondo hailed the project Tuesday, saying it will replace aging power plants and reduce air pollution. But the plan was met with skepticism and opposition by residents and environmental advocates.

Photo Courtesy of Ocean Exploration Trust

Scientists at the University of Rhode Island may mount a research expedition to the most active underwater volcano in the Caribbean Sea. Disaster management authorities there have been on alert for more than a week. Earthquakes have been recorded around the area of the volcano known as Kick’Em Jenny off the coast of the island of Grenada, indicating a potential eruption. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Deepwater Wind has installed the first of five steel foundations for a wind farm that will sit three miles off the coast of Block Island. The project is expected to produce enough energy to power 17,000 homes. State and federal officials got an up-close look at construction for the first time yesterday. Rhode Island Public Radio environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza was with them, and she reports that Rhode Island has become an example for how to build renewable energy. 

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