Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Less than 24 hours after reports of their detention emerged, 10 U.S. Navy personnel have been freed by Iran. The sailors left an Iranian naval base on Farsi Island in the Persian Gulf on Wednesday morning, along with the boats they were operating when they were taken into custody.

"There are no indications that the sailors were harmed during their brief detention," the Department of Defense says, confirming the release of nine men and one woman.

The California Air Resources Board has rejected Volkswagen's plan to recall cars with 2-liter diesel engines that trick emissions tests, saying the company's plan is incomplete. The Environmental Protection Agency says it concurs.

From 2009 to 2014, more than 73,000 guns that were seized in Mexico were traced to the U.S., according to a new update on the effort to fight weapons trafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The figure, based on data from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, represents about 70 percent of the 104,850 firearms seized by Mexican authorities that were also submitted to U.S. authorities for tracing.

They only met last summer — but now media mogul Rupert Murdoch, 84, and former supermodel Jerry Hall, 59, say they're planning a wedding. The pair announced their upcoming nuptials in Britain's The Times, which Murdoch owns.

At least 10 people are dead and more than a dozen wounded after an explosion struck a historic district in Istanbul on Tuesday morning. Civilians and tourists are among the victims from what officials say was a suicide blast in Sultanahmet Square, site of the famed Blue Mosque.

After the blast, speculation immediately began to fly over who might be responsible. Many fingers pointed at ISIS because of the apparent target — a historic cultural area that's popular with tourists.

Nearly six months after his most recent escape from a maximum security prison in Mexico, drug kingpin Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán has been caught, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto announced via Twitter.

After news emerged that a commonly used American missile wound up in Cuba following a training exercise in Europe, a U.S. official said the Hellfire missile is inert, lacking key components. The missile arrived in Cuba in 2014; since then, U.S. requests for its return have gone unheeded.

To many, the life and career of Motörhead frontman Lemmy Kilmister personified heavy metal. Now his fans want his name on one of the four new "superheavy" elements on the periodic chart. An online petition has attracted more than 100,000 signatures in just a few days.

Both men are Palestinians who were born in Iraq and came to the U.S. as refugees. And in Houston and Sacramento, federal authorities arrested them Thursday, on charges ranging from making false statements to giving support to ISIS.

Law enforcement officials say there was no sign of a plot to carry out an attack in the U.S. Despite announcing the arrests in quick succession, the Justice Department did not say whether the two cases are somehow linked.

A fingerprint of Paris bombing suspect Salah Abdeslam has been found in an apartment in the Schaerbeek district of Brussels, officials say, along with traces of explosives and handmade belts.

The federal prosecutor's office says that after the apartment was rented under an assumed name, people involved in November's deadly attacks in Paris may have used the space to produce explosives and prepare for the attack.

Settling two lawsuits that alleged discriminatory and unjustified surveillance of Muslims, the New York City Police Department has agreed to new safeguards against overly broad surveillance. The deal calls for a civilian representative to monitor police investigations involving political or religious activity.

The settlement deal promises a new chapter in a long-running dispute, in which the plaintiffs say they were the subject of baseless surveillance and profiling by the NYPD.

The ethics commission of track and field's governing body, the International Association of Athletics Federations, has issued a five-year ban on the former head of its anti-doping unit — and lifetime bans on the former president of Russia's athletic federation and two others.

The case centers on doping violations by Russian long-distance runner Lilya Shobukhova "and the exaction of monies from her as the price to pay for enabling her" to compete in the London 2012 Olympics and other events, the IAAF commission says.

Seventeen miners at a salt mine in western New York were freed early this morning after they were trapped hundreds of feet underground when the elevator they were in stopped working late Wednesday night.

Another sharp fall forced China's stock market to close less than 30 minutes after trading began Thursday, setting up another rough day for investors. In the first half-hour of U.S. trading, the Dow Jones index fell by more than 1.2 percent — and that was after clawing back 90 points of an initial drop.

After trading in China was halted automatically the second time this week, officials said Thursday that they're suspending the "circuit breaker" that shuts down the market if a key index falls by 7 percent.

Chinese media say it's the first legal case to center on the rights of same-sex couples to marry: a gay man has sued a civil affairs bureau in Hunan province for rejecting his attempt to register his marriage to his boyfriend. A court accepted the case Tuesday.

The local court in Changsha, in central China's Hunan province, was responding to a filing made in December by Sun Wenlin, 26, who says an official in Changsha refused his application to marry his partner because their union wasn't between a man and a woman.

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