Bill Gale

Performing Arts Critic

Bill Gale has had a widely varied career (including a stint as an air traffic controller) before dedicating himself to The Providence Journal for 35 years — 25 of those as the Journal's theater and dance critic. He is the former executive committee chair of the Foundation of the American Theater Critics Association and currently serves on their board.Gale has received a variety of awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the New England Theatre Conference. He has taught at Rhode Island College and Roger Williams University, and is currently an Admiral at Hope High School. He is married to clinical social worker Peggy Gale and is the father of two children. And he loves working in radio.

Ways to Connect

Maggie Hall / Wilbury Theatre Group

Providence's Wilbury Theatre Group has never avoided doing the controversial. Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale says their current play, “Straight White Men” definitely fits into that catalog.

Peter Goldberg / Gamm Theatre

Playwright David Mamet is well known for works such as “Glengarry Glen Ross” and “Speed-The-Plow.” But many think “American Buffalo” is his masterpiece. Bill Gale says the Gamm Theater's production is proof of that. “American Buffalo” was first done in Chicago way back in 1975, that time – if you can believe it - of no cell phones , no Facebook. And Twitter? That was something birds in the trees did. So “American Buffalo,” a look at three guys struggling and not succeeding, flashed on to the...

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

“Appropriate” is both brilliant and bitter, overdone and incisive. At times, it seems to be right on, an American original, both hilarious and heartbreaking. Other times it has you asking just what are these people on stage doing, for heaven’s sake? For two hours forty-five minutes (including two intermissions) it is a play of rage and regret, of lives ruined, hope gone. But. It's also a comedy, believe it or not, hilarious, laughing out loud funny amid all the tears, all the heartbreak. “Un...

Andrew Iacovelli/Burbage Theatre Company

Rhode Island's booming theater scene is in full pulse these days Which has lead Rhode Island Public Radio's Bill Gale to double up.

PETER GOLDBERG / Gamm Theatre

The Czechoslovakian-born English writer Tom Stoppard's 1993 play “Arcadia” was a huge hit in London and well-enough received in New York. Now the Gamm Theatre has taken on the work.

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep opens the theater season with a musical called "Beowolf. A Thousand Years of Baggage." Rhode Island Public Radio Theater Critic Bill Gale says "baggage" is not the word he would use, but whip-smart theater filled with great rock music and talented performers pretty much sums it up.

Island Moving Company

After a trip half-way around the world to Kazakhstan, Newport's Island Moving Company is home and holding it's annual Great Friends Dance Festival.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre Company

“Damn Yankees” is a musical from the 1950s that's not really about the New York Yankees. Instead it’s about being faithful, caring and decent.

John Bender / RIPR

This year’s Claiborne Pell Award for Lifetime Achievements in the Arts were presented to Trinity Rep's former artistic director Oskar Eustis and his wife Laurie at Salve Regina University in Newport Monday.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Trinity Rep has chosen the great 1943 musical “Oklahoma!” to close its season.

Mark Turek / Ocean State Theatre

“Anything Goes” is a classic Broadway musical that first appeared in 1934. Now the Ocean State Theatre Company is doing a re-done version from 1987. Bill Gale says the result is pretty darn good – with some reservations. Let's begin with the good stuff. After all, “Anything Goes” is filled, saturated actually, with the music (and lyrics) of the great Cole Porter. If you are of a certain age, or a person of any age who loves good songs, you get a kick out of this show. Tunes such as “You're...

Gamm Theatre

Pawtucket's Gamm Theatre is closing its season with one of William Shakespeare's most difficult to do plays.

Mark Turek/Trinity Rep.

“Arnie Louis and Bob” checks out three old timers, brothers ranging from their late-60s to mid-70s. All three could be called wanderers, guys who spend considerable amounts of time looking for things they can't have. Arnie cuts grass and plows snow. Makes a living at it too, more or less. Louis is depressed, beaten down, and barely in touch with reality. Bob runs an ice-making Zamboni machine -- when he's not longing for even a glimpse of Taylor Swift, that is.

Mark Turek / Trinity Rep

Over the years Trinity Rep has made its mark taking new looks at classic plays. This time out it's “To Kill a Mockingbird” that is seen with a fresh perspective. RIPR theater critic Bill Gale says the new take works, but just barely. That's right. Since the days of leadership by Adrian Hall, Trinity has rarely done a show in the usual way. Think of a 1920s car being driven, more or less, through the upstairs theater decades ago. Or remember an onstage abortion, or a veteran actor chopping a...

In the past Festival Ballet Providence's popular Up Close on Hope series has presented evenings with half-a-dozen, or more, works by various choreographers. But beginning tonight Up Close will present just two pieces, each taken from classic tales, both world premieres by choreographers familiar to Festival Ballet fans. One is Venezuelan-born dancer-choreographer,” Gianni Di Marco's view of Marguerite Gautier's “Lady of the Camellias,” a romantic idle, looking at love, and eventual death. The...

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