Chuck Hinman

Morning Edition host

Chuck became part of RIPR in 2012 after a career on commercial radio. He got his broadcasting start as an announcer for Off Track Betting Corporation in NYC. He’s been a news director, music director, production director and morning personality on radio stations in Providence and Boston. 

A native of New Jersey, Chuck attended the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and graduated from the University of Vermont with a BA in Mass Communications.                    

 

Ways to Connect

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

At least 250 people turned out for a congressional town hall meeting at Coventry High School Sunday, hosted by three-fourths of Rhode Island’s Democratic congressional delegation- Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and 2nd District Representative Jim Langevin.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

An unusual funeral takes place in Providence Friday afternoon. It’s for a building: the John E. Fogarty Memorial Building on Fountain St. Built by the state in 1968 to house the Department of Human Services, it’s being torn down now, after a period of emptiness and deterioration.

Courtesy of Bernard Georges

Bernard Georges is the founder of the non-profit New Bridges for Haitian Success, an organization to help Haitian immigrants in Rhode Island. Georges recently returned from a trip to Haiti where he delivered aid to those affected by Hurricane Matthew. He stopped by the studio for a conversation with our morning host Chuck Hinman.


Chuck Hinman / RIPR

For this month’s Artscape, we preview the first show of the season, at the Theater Department of Brown University.

It’s a musical. Not just any musical, but one conceived, with music and lyrics, by Lin-Manuel Miranda, the man behind the theater phenomenon of Hamilton. It’s called In The Heights, and is a success in its own right, winner of four Tony Awards in 2008.


Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Pearl Nathan, long-time volunteer docent at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, and the namesake for the Museum's new coffee shop, Cafe Pearl, has died at the age of 103. 

Christy Clark-Pujara is an assistant professor of history in the Department of African-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the author of the recent book "Dark Work: the Business of Slavery in Rhode Island." 


Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission

On the National Register of Historic Places, the Ochee Spring Quarry in Johnston preserves a record of soapstone bowl-making dating back at least 3,000 years.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Opened in 1959, Town Hall Lanes is a staple of Johnston. Birthday parties are commonplace, and local bowling teams are there every weekend. In today’s One Square Mile: Johnston, a postcard from a town favorite.


Chuck Hinman

Johnston is home to one of the oldest houses in Rhode Island: the Clemence-Irons House, built in 1691. It's right on George Waterman Road, but if you don't slow down, you'll miss it. 

Chuck Hinman

For the second weekend in a row, a large crowd gathered Sunday on the State House lawn in Providence to protest the administration of President Donald Trump. 

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman speaks to author Dawn Tripp of Westport, MA. In Tripp’s latest novel, Georgia, she imagines the inner life of Georgia O’Keefe, an American painter known for still lives and landscapes that evoke sensual femininity. Tripp’s book is out in paperback this month. 

Twitter screensave

Perhaps Twitter should come up with a warning for politicians and public officials: Tweet at Your Own Risk. The Vice President of the East Greenwich Town Council discovered that risk over the weekend, when he tweeted a joke about the Womens' Marches taking place around the country.

Republican Sean Todd's tweet said, "Definitely a guy came up with the idea for the #womensmarch perfect way to get the wives outta the house."    

RIPR FILE

Governor Gina Raimondo delivers her State of the State speech tonight at the Statehouse. 

Chuck Hinman

Earlier this month, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan. While not quite as shocking as when Dylan went electric at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, the award still caused some controversy among those critics who felt it was artistically unjustified. They said the singer-songwriter known for such influential songs as “Blowing in the Wind” and “Like a Rolling Stone” was not creating literature.

For this month’s Artscape, RIPR’s Chuck Hinman gets some perspective on the award from Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, who also teaches a seminar on Dylan.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Since the 1960’s, obesity among children has more than quadrupled, from about 4.5 percent to nearly 20 percent in 2014, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent statistics show that efforts to combat childhood obesity have shown some success, including the efforts of school districts to provide healthier meals and require physical education.

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