Chuck Hinman

Morning Edition host

Chuck became part of RIPR in 2012 after a career on commercial radio. He got his broadcasting start as an announcer for Off Track Betting Corporation in NYC. He’s been a news director, music director, production director and morning personality on radio stations in Providence and Boston. 

A native of New Jersey, Chuck attended the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and graduated from the University of Vermont with a BA in Mass Communications.                    

 

Ways to Connect

Francesca Gallo / Doors Open RI

The Smith Hill neighborhood in Providence has seen waves of immigrants over the years. The Irish were first, in the early 19th century. Now the neighborhood is almost half Hispanic and Asian, according to the 2010 census. At one time, it was the center of a sizeable Jewish community, and a single synagogue remains.

RIPR FILE PHOTO

A new effort to combat opioid addiction and overdose deaths opened Monday in Rhode Island. Lifespan, the state’s largest hospital system, is running an outpatient treatment facility called the Lifespan Recovery Center in Providence.

Some 58,000 Haitians in the United States, including some in Rhode Island, have received a six-month extension of their special immigration status, known as Temporary Protected Status, or TPS. It was first granted after Haiti’s catastrophic earthquake in 2010.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

The community arts studio New Urban Arts in Providence is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. The organization provides mentoring relationships between high school students and emerging artists. The anniversary comes at a time when public funding for the arts faces threats from a new administration in Washington, and a rally is scheduled for next Thursday, June 1st, at the State House, in support of public arts funding.

Picture this: you’re a visiting professor at Roger Williams University Law School, and you have some experience defending members of the military. Then you watch a classified video made public on WikiLeaks where Americans fire on – and kill -- Iraqis from an Apache Helicopter.

"At the time I saw the collateral murder video air, and I remember thinking to myself whoever released that was going to be in a lot of trouble," said Rhode Island-based attorney David Coombs.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

For this month’s Artscape, we visit an exhibit of politically-inspired work done by three local artists on display now at OneWay Gallery in Narragansett. 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

At least 250 people turned out for a congressional town hall meeting at Coventry High School Sunday, hosted by three-fourths of Rhode Island’s Democratic congressional delegation- Sens. Jack Reed and Sheldon Whitehouse and 2nd District Representative Jim Langevin.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

An unusual funeral takes place in Providence Friday afternoon. It’s for a building: the John E. Fogarty Memorial Building on Fountain St. Built by the state in 1968 to house the Department of Human Services, it’s being torn down now, after a period of emptiness and deterioration.

Courtesy of Bernard Georges

Bernard Georges is the founder of the non-profit New Bridges for Haitian Success, an organization to help Haitian immigrants in Rhode Island. Georges recently returned from a trip to Haiti where he delivered aid to those affected by Hurricane Matthew. He stopped by the studio for a conversation with our morning host Chuck Hinman.


Chuck Hinman / RIPR

For this month’s Artscape, we preview the first show of the season, at the Theater Department of Brown University.

It’s a musical. Not just any musical, but one conceived, with music and lyrics, by Lin-Manuel Miranda, the man behind the theater phenomenon of Hamilton. It’s called In The Heights, and is a success in its own right, winner of four Tony Awards in 2008.


Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Pearl Nathan, long-time volunteer docent at the Rhode Island School of Design Museum, and the namesake for the Museum's new coffee shop, Cafe Pearl, has died at the age of 103. 

Christy Clark-Pujara is an assistant professor of history in the Department of African-American Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the author of the recent book "Dark Work: the Business of Slavery in Rhode Island." 


Rhode Island Historical Preservation & Heritage Commission

On the National Register of Historic Places, the Ochee Spring Quarry in Johnston preserves a record of soapstone bowl-making dating back at least 3,000 years.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Opened in 1959, Town Hall Lanes is a staple of Johnston. Birthday parties are commonplace, and local bowling teams are there every weekend. In today’s One Square Mile: Johnston, a postcard from a town favorite.


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