Chuck Hinman

Morning Edition host

Chuck became part of RIPR in 2012 after a career on commercial radio. He got his broadcasting start as an announcer for Off Track Betting Corporation in NYC. He’s been a news director, music director, production director and morning personality on radio stations in Providence and Boston. 

A native of New Jersey, Chuck attended the School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and graduated from the University of Vermont with a BA in Mass Communications.                    

 

Ways to Connect

Twitter screensave

Perhaps Twitter should come up with a warning for politicians and public officials: Tweet at Your Own Risk. The Vice President of the East Greenwich Town Council discovered that risk over the weekend, when he tweeted a joke about the Womens' Marches taking place around the country.

Republican Sean Todd's tweet said, "Definitely a guy came up with the idea for the #womensmarch perfect way to get the wives outta the house."    

RIPR FILE

Governor Gina Raimondo delivers her State of the State speech tonight at the Statehouse. 

Chuck Hinman

Earlier this month, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize for Literature to Bob Dylan. While not quite as shocking as when Dylan went electric at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, the award still caused some controversy among those critics who felt it was artistically unjustified. They said the singer-songwriter known for such influential songs as “Blowing in the Wind” and “Like a Rolling Stone” was not creating literature.

For this month’s Artscape, RIPR’s Chuck Hinman gets some perspective on the award from Harvard classics professor Richard Thomas, who also teaches a seminar on Dylan.


Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Since the 1960’s, obesity among children has more than quadrupled, from about 4.5 percent to nearly 20 percent in 2014, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Recent statistics show that efforts to combat childhood obesity have shown some success, including the efforts of school districts to provide healthier meals and require physical education.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Howard "Howdy" White, a former associate chaplain at St. George’s School in Middletown, pleaded not guilty Tuesday in Boston to charges of assault and battery. He's accused of assaulting a then 16-year-old St. George’s student during two trips to Boston more than 40 years ago. 

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Following the election of Donald Trump, immigrants are expressing concerns that his harsh rhetoric now promises to become policy in the incoming administration. In Rhode Island, advocates who work with immigrants and refugees say there aren’t enough immigration lawyers to answer their clients’ concerns. 

Yale Art Gallery

For November's Artscape, we visited New Haven, Connecticut, where an exhibit at the Yale University Art Gallery showcases the dramatic artistry of furniture making in colonial-era Rhode Island. Rhode Island Public Radio's Chuck Hinman talked with the gallery's Curator of American Decorative Arts, Patricia Kane, about Art & Industry in Early America: Rhode Island Furniture, 1650-1830.

Elisabeth Harrison

After a contentious presidential campaign, many communities -- and even families -- remain divided over the election of Republican Donald Trump. That’s been a challenge for churches, synagogues and other places of worship, where people with strong feelings may sit side-by-side each week.

Chuck Hinman / RIPR

Festival Ballet in Providence concludes its "Up Close on Hope" series of programs on Friday and Saturday nights, with a unique collaboration between choreographer Ty Parmenter and storyteller Valerie Tutson. The pair teamed up to produce an original dance set to the spoken word piece "How We Got the Stars." 

Originally a story told by the Zulu people, Parmenter has created a dance for four dancers choreographed to Tutson's telling of the story. Parmenter and Tutson spoke to Rhode Island Public Radio’s Chuck Hinman about how the piece evolved.

Marc Nozell / Flickr

National polling shows a tightening race for presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. In Rhode Island, Clinton is expected to win, but Republicans say don’t count Trump out just yet.

Tony Kent/flickr / Creative Commons License

Rhode Island has a storied haunted history, from Mercy Brown, the 19th century "vampire" in Exeter, to H.P. Lovecraft, the author of weird and spooky tales who called Providence home. The new "Guidebook to Haunted and Strange Places in Rhode Island" is out just in time for Halloween,

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Ahead of the presidential election, we’ve been hearing from voters across the country and the state. Analysts have remarked on the heated rhetoric of this year’s elections; specifically language used to describe immigrants, refugees and Muslim Americans. 

RIPR FILE

Our Rhody Votes 2016 coverage continues, with a look at Ballot Question 2, the Rhode Island Ethics Commission Amendment. It asks voters whether to restore the Commission’s jurisdiction over General Assembly members. 

RIPR FILE

CHUCK: Rhode Islanders head to the polls in a few short weeks to vote in the presidential election and decide several local races and ballot questions. One of those questions is whether to invest  $50 million dollars into affordable housing. The bond is question seven on the November ballot, and Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender joins us now with more details. Good morning John.

JOHN: Hey Chuck.

CHUCK: So John, voters approved similar bonds for affordable housing in 2009 and 2012, worth a combined roughly $73 million. What happened to that money? 

Now playing in theaters, the film "The Birth of a Nation," reclaims the title of a 1915 movie by D.W. Griffith, which remains highly controversial for its seemingly sympathetic portrayal of the Confederacy and the Ku Klux Klan, and its use of black face. The new film, from Actor and Director Nate Parker, tells the story of the Nat Turner Rebellion, a slave uprising in Virginia in 1831 that left scores of white men, women, and children dead.

Pages