Frederic Reamer

Producer - This I Believe: Rhode Island

Frederic Reamer, PhD, brings sophistication to Rhode Island Public Radio as the producer of the compelling series This I Believe – Rhode Island, modeled on the national This I Believe project.

Reamer's involvement with National Public Radio began in 2000 when he was invited to broadcast a national commentary for All Things Considered. Over the years, Reamer has made guest appearances on various radio broadcasts throughout the country. His own This I Believe essay was broadcast on NPR in 2005 as part of the national series. In March of 2007, Dr. Reamer became the producer of This I Believe – Rhode Island, which broadcasts weekly on RIPR.

Reamer is a professor in the graduate program of the School of Social Work at Rhode Island College. He has lectured nationally and internationally on the subjects of professional ethics, professional malpractice and liability. Reamer is also the author of books on professional ethics, criminal justice, and research methods.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Signs

Jun 30, 2015

Many years ago my wife and I took a late afternoon hike in a nearby forest. We sauntered through the dense woods with our then-infant daughter nestled in the pack on my back.  We lost track of time and suddenly noticed that the sun was setting far earlier than we expected.  We were out of infant formula.  Despite our usually reliable sense of direction, we discovered we were truly lost in the forest.  Eventually we found our way out, but not without a sense of panic.  What a metaphor that experience became, teaching me about the profound importance of subtle signs in life’s proverbial forest, instincts shared by John Minahan.

John Minahan teaches English and Psychology at the Lincoln School in Providence.  Minahan is a former professional musician and college instructor who lives in Providence.  

This I Believe Rhode Island: Bluebirds

Jun 23, 2015

Who among us didn’t feel challenged by this past winter’s relentless weather assaults?  The remarkably steady diet of ominous forecasts and their as-advertised aftermath is reminiscent of those chapters in our lives when there’s that steady drip of really bad news, or at least disquieting news.  But haven’t we learned that amidst a steady stream of daunting storms in our lives, often there are remarkably hopeful signs?  That’s what we hear from Lori Ayotte.

Lori Ayotte teaches World Literature and Creative Writing at Sharon High School in Massachusetts. She lives in Cumberland, Rhode Island.

  Some years ago, Sissela Bok, a moral philosopher, wrote a book entitled Lying in which she explores the ways in which people struggle to be truthful in their private and public lives, especially in circumstances that tempt us to lie or, at the very least, shade the truth -- sometimes for self-serving purposes and sometimes for what appear to be more magnanimous goals.  For many, truth telling is a lifelong challenge.  And as we hear from a very wise 13-year-old, Bea Hruska, our lifelong instincts are often sown in childhood.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Neighbors

Jun 9, 2015

Community.  It's such a simple word, and it's bandied about so casually that it seems almost trite.  Yet for many Rhode Islanders, a deep sense of community is what keeps us rooted in the Ocean State, not only in our connections to Westerly and Warren, Cumberland and Cranston, but in our own unique neighborhood, to our friends at church or synagogue, and to the people we expect to bump into at the diner down the street.  In this encore essay, theater director Curt Columbus tells us what community in his corner of Rhode Island means to him.

 

Curt Columbus takes walks near his home in Pawtucket and is artistic director of the Trinity Repertory Company.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Homesick

Jun 2, 2015

Maturation is a wonderful thing – if and when it happens, of course.  If we’re really fortunate, throughout our lives we have the wherewithal to learn from our mistaken assumptions and correct course. H. G. Wells once famously wrote, “There's truths you have to grow into.”  For some of us, it takes decades to grow into these truths.  But sometimes even an adolescent has the ability to face life’s hard truths, as with twelve-year-old Anika Istok.

Anika Istok is completing the seventh grade at the Gordon School in East Providence.  She lives with her family in Cranston.

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