Frederic Reamer

Producer - This I Believe: Rhode Island

Frederic Reamer, PhD, brings sophistication to Rhode Island Public Radio as the producer of the compelling series This I Believe – Rhode Island, modeled on the national This I Believe project.

Reamer's involvement with National Public Radio began in 2000 when he was invited to broadcast a national commentary for All Things Considered. Over the years, Reamer has made guest appearances on various radio broadcasts throughout the country. His own This I Believe essay was broadcast on NPR in 2005 as part of the national series. In March of 2007, Dr. Reamer became the producer of This I Believe – Rhode Island, which broadcasts weekly on RIPR.

Reamer is a professor in the graduate program of the School of Social Work at Rhode Island College. He has lectured nationally and internationally on the subjects of professional ethics, professional malpractice and liability. Reamer is also the author of books on professional ethics, criminal justice, and research methods.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Winter

Feb 24, 2015

Here we are, right smack in the heart of another New England winter.  For some, this stretch of months with early sunsets is filled with dread -- frosty temperatures, snow piles to shovel, and ice patches to dodge.  But for others of us, this wintry mix is the stuff of pure delight.  As the poet Robert Frost wrote, "You can't get too much winter in the winter."  And we hear similar sentiments in this encore essay from Gabriel Warren.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Parenting Recipe

Feb 17, 2015

Every parent discovers, sooner or later, that the parenting journey is full of surprises, some remarkably pleasant and some, well, not so much.  Haven't many of us yearned for the nonexistent owner's manual to help us navigate those unusually challenging situations that parenting somehow manages to produce?  Laura Rossi Totten shares her unique take on the parenting lessons she has learned, courtesy of some very special moments with her daughter.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Overcoming Racism

Feb 10, 2015

Sadly, the news continues to provide all of us with a steady diet of ugly stories about racism in America, a nagging challenge that persists in far too many corners of our world.   Rosa Parks, the courageous civil rights activist who refused to give up her bus seat nearly 60 years ago in Montgomery, Alabama once said:  “Racism is still with us.  But it is up to us to prepare our children for what they have to meet, and, hopefully, we shall overcome.”  And we hear echoes of these sentiments more than a half century later from seventeen-year-old Alannah Bareham.

Alannah Bareham is a lifelong Rhode Islander and a junior at the Providence Country Day School.  Alannah reports that she loves physics as much as art and is passionate about painting and running.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Providence

Feb 3, 2015

A sense of place.  Community.  Roots.  Some of us spend a lifetime trying to figure out where we’re from, who we are, where we belong.  Oliver Wendell Holmes – the poet and physician whose son became a U.S. Supreme Court Justice – once wrote, “Where we love is home, home that our feet may leave, but not our hearts.”  We hear from Ria Mirchandani about her fruitful search for a sense of home as she forges her path in life.

 

Ria Mirchandani is a senior at Brown University.  She was born in Nashua, New Hampshire, raised in Mumbai, India, and has come of age in Providence.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Diversity

Jan 27, 2015

What is it that draws so many of us to the Ocean State and keeps us here, even when opportunities elsewhere beckon?  In a word, community.  Somehow Rhode Island’s intimate and quirky scale, its mix of neighborhood and neighborhood characters – even with their sometimes rough edges – manage to pull us in and get ahold of us, a bit like flypaper.  For so many of us, Rhode Island’s complex richness seeps into our bones and, even with all its challenges, becomes part of who we are.  And that’s just what we hear from Karen Lee Ziner in this encore essay.

Karen Lee Ziner has lived in Providence since 1980.  She is a staff writer for The Providence Journal. A version of this essay previously appeared in the Providence Sunday Journal.

All of us have known someone in the midst of deep, relentless despair, someone whose challenges in life seem so intractable, so overwhelming that there doesn't appear to be a way out.  Sadly some people feel so hopeless that their will to live evaporates.  Others somehow manage to move forward toward whatever light glimmers at the end of a long, dark tunnel.  Brian Shanley is living proof of what it means to have hope -- real hope -- in the throes of agonizing anguish.

Brian Shanley grew up in Attleboro, Massachusetts, attended Providence College, and, for graduate school, Salve Regina University, where he now serves as associate dean of admissions.  Shanley lives with his wife and son in Newport, Rhode Island.

The kindness of strangers.  How wonderful it is when, out of the pure goodness of their hearts, complete strangers step in to rescue us in moments of peril.  When it occurs, unvarnished altruism is remarkable.  Ralph Waldo Emerson once wrote, “You cannot do a kindness too soon, for you never know how soon it will be too late.” Bill Miles is here to tell us what it’s like to be on the receiving end of truly extraordinary kindness.

 

Bill Miles, a resident of Seekonk, Massachusetts, is a professor of political science at Northeastern University.  One month before getting his scars in Ouagadougou, his new book on postcolonial legacies, Scars of Partition, was released by the University of Nebraska Press.

 

Parenting is a very tricky proposition, filled with lots of surprises – some pleasant and some, well, not so much . . . surprises that aren’t addressed in the owner’s manual.  Most parents do their best to sort it all out as they go along, hoping their instincts and judgments are good ones or, at least, not disastrous.  Our hope, of course, is that over time our children find a path in life that’s filled with meaning and purpose.  And those are the wistful sentiments we hear from Maryellen Butke.

Maryellen Butke describes herself as an avid political junkie and advocate for education and equality.  Butke advises education philanthropists to enhance their impact.  She and her partner Jo live in Providence with their children Alicia and Matthew.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Creating Beauty

Dec 30, 2014

The famed cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead once opined, "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."  Such sentiments often conjure up images of sweeping social change.  But as we hear from Diana Jackson in this encore essay, a small group of committed people can also have a profound impact on the quality of life in our own little corner of the world here in the Ocean State.

Diana Harmon Jackson is an artist, educator, political activist, and, she reports, lover of people, especially kids and older adults. Her passions are family, friends, music, art, and, as we've just heard embedded in her eloquent words, nature.

Water

Jan 9, 2013

Have you noticed how a bit of travel can do so much to help us gain perspective on our lives?  Stepping into another culture teaches us about our own, which all of a sudden appears in sharp contrast.  Even traveling across the U.S. can help us view our day-to-day lives through a very different lens, where what was once routine and prosaic now seems much more profound.  As we hear in this encore essay, Daniel Combs discovered this during his own travels, drip by drip.

This I Believe RI: Midlife Motherhood

Jan 2, 2013

Women over 40 come into motherhood in several different ways. What they share is a fierceness of spirit, perseverance and a host of other qualities. Cyma Shapiro, in her work with midlife mothers, aims to dispel myths about this group; redefine women and middle age; and provide these mothers with a voice, face and forum. Her essay about her own midlife-motherhood journey also speaks to this group’s singular truths about the breakdown of all relational obstacles, and love and life choices.

Adults tend to think that life lessons must be learned through decades' worth of experience, complex study, rigorous analysis, and, perhaps, therapy. But the truth is, children sometimes are able to reach astonishingly profound insights about life simply by doing what children are supposed to do, playing games with one another. And that's certainly the case with 13-year-old Raghu Nimmagadda.

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