John Bender

Reporter

John started at RIPR in 2013 as the Morning Edition producer; researching stories, interviewing newsmakers, and writing scripts for stories every morning.  Plus special projects and regular reporting on major events.  In early 2017 he was promoted to "general assignment" reporter.  Whatever's happening in the news today?  That's what John is covering. 

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John Bender / RIPR

The release of more information comes as questions continue to be raised about the police use of deadly force.

Tuesday morning, State Police released the names of the officers involved in the shooting. Two of them are 20-year veterans of the State Police. The other officers have been part of the force for 12 and 6 years. 

John Bender / RIPR

An East Greenwich Town Council meeting was forced to shut down after hundreds of angry residents turned out, and many were turned away. 

John Bender / RIPR

The city of Providence has suffered a trauma. That’s the view of Roger Williams University Criminal Justice Professor Sean Varano, who weighed in Monday on the fatal police shooting of a suspect on Interstate-95. 

John Bender / RIPR

Law enforcement officials are not releasing details about the man who was shot and killed by police on a stretch of I-95 Thursday morning near the Providence Place mall. A woman was also hurt during the shooting and was brought to the hospital.

Dank Depot / Creative Commons License via Flickr

Roughly 18,000, that’s the number of Rhode Islanders currently enrolled in the state’s medical marijuana program. Members of a new recreational marijuana study commission got an update on that program Tuesday, as they consider whether the state should legalize recreational pot. This was the group's second meeting.

John Bender / RIPR

Nancy Pelosi, the U.S. House Minority leader, railed against the proposed Republican tax overhaul during a visit to the Ocean State Monday. Pelosi joined the state’s congressional delegation during a tour at the Community College of Rhode Island in Warwick.

Some Rhode Islanders were just getting their power back Friday, after hurricane-force winds left more than 140,000 people in the state without power Sunday night. But five days later, more than 1,000 people were still off-line across the state.

RIPR FILE

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza is moving forward with a municipal identification program first announced in his 2018 city budget. Elorza signed an executive order enacting the program on Thursday. 

Stacy Spensley / CC 2.0 via Flickr

If your power is back on, or if you have yet to get the power back, there are some safety concerns to keep in mind. For one thing, you may have to say goodbye to some groceries.

Louis-Léopold Boilly / Wikimedia Commons

For centuries classical music composers have been inspired by witches, ghosts, death and the devil. They’ve returned again and again to one instrument in particular to help conjure these spooky themes: the violin.

So what’s the link between Satan and one of the most popular instruments in the world? Music historian Robert Riggs actually devotes an entire chapter to the subject in his book “The Violin.”

Riggs finds the connection actually dates back to medieval times with the separation of sacred and secular music.

John Bender

"It sounded like a war zone." That's how Warwick resident Adam Logan described the storm that knocked out power to his home and more than 140,000 others across Rhode Island.

Lynn Arditi

In the town of Barrington, nearly all National Grid customers were without power Monday morning, some 5,377 households and businesses, according to the utility's website.

John Bender / RIPR

In Warwick, the Rhode Island city with the largest number of customers who lost power, nearly 14,000 homes and businesses remained in the dark Monday evening. Residents and work crews spent much of the day cleaning up debris and waiting for the power to come back.

Students in Rhode Island say they’d like more direction at school when it comes to things like college and job planning. Those are just a couple of things that students say they want from their education.  The students spoke out as part of a report from the children’s advocacy nonprofit Rhode Island Kids Count.

John Bender / RIPR

Across the country, and in New England, elementary schools are revamping recess with a focus on organized games and teamwork, instead of free play.

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