John Bender

Reporter

John started at RIPR in 2013 as the Morning Edition producer; researching stories, interviewing newsmakers, and writing scripts for stories every morning.  Plus special projects and regular reporting on major events.  In early 2017 he was promoted to "general assignment" reporter.  Whatever's happening in the news today?  That's what John is covering. 

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John Bender / RIPR

Nancy Pelosi, the U.S. House Minority leader, railed against the proposed Republican tax overhaul during a visit to the Ocean State Monday. Pelosi joined the state’s congressional delegation during a tour at the Community College of Rhode Island in Warwick.

Some Rhode Islanders were just getting their power back Friday, after hurricane-force winds left more than 140,000 people in the state without power Sunday night. But five days later, more than 1,000 people were still off-line across the state.

RIPR FILE

Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza is moving forward with a municipal identification program first announced in his 2018 city budget. Elorza signed an executive order enacting the program on Thursday. 

Stacy Spensley / CC 2.0 via Flickr

If your power is back on, or if you have yet to get the power back, there are some safety concerns to keep in mind. For one thing, you may have to say goodbye to some groceries.

Louis-Léopold Boilly / Wikimedia Commons

For centuries classical music composers have been inspired by witches, ghosts, death and the devil. They’ve returned again and again to one instrument in particular to help conjure these spooky themes: the violin.

So what’s the link between Satan and one of the most popular instruments in the world? Music historian Robert Riggs actually devotes an entire chapter to the subject in his book “The Violin.”

Riggs finds the connection actually dates back to medieval times with the separation of sacred and secular music.

John Bender

"It sounded like a war zone." That's how Warwick resident Adam Logan described the storm that knocked out power to his home and more than 140,000 others across Rhode Island.

Lynn Arditi

In the town of Barrington, nearly all National Grid customers were without power Monday morning, some 5,377 households and businesses, according to the utility's website.

John Bender / RIPR

In Warwick, the Rhode Island city with the largest number of customers who lost power, nearly 14,000 homes and businesses remained in the dark Monday evening. Residents and work crews spent much of the day cleaning up debris and waiting for the power to come back.

Students in Rhode Island say they’d like more direction at school when it comes to things like college and job planning. Those are just a couple of things that students say they want from their education.  The students spoke out as part of a report from the children’s advocacy nonprofit Rhode Island Kids Count.

John Bender / RIPR

Across the country, and in New England, elementary schools are revamping recess with a focus on organized games and teamwork, instead of free play.

ONNE VAN DER WAL / Oliver Hazard Perry Rhode Island

The Newport-based tall ship, the Oliver Hazard Perry, is set to be back up and running by Tuesday. The vessel lost power and floated through Newport Harbor Sunday evening, the ship knocked into several other boats moored in the harbor.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

A proposal to cut 40 percent of the pension benefits for all current and former employees of St. Joseph Health Services of Rhode Island is off the table – at least for now.

John Bender / RIPR

EPA head Scott Pruitt wants to dismantle the policy known as the Clean Power Plan, adopted in 2015 to help reduce greenhouse gases. 

John Bender / RIPR

How do you turn around a struggling middle school? It’s a question teachers, administrators, and city leaders are trying to figure out in the state’s biggest school district. Providence is focusing this year on its middle schools.

Isaac Bowen / CC BY 2.0 via Flickr

Thursday is the last chance for recipients of the federal immigration program Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals to renew their status. After that, the federal government has announced it will wind down the program, which allows residents brought into the country illegally as children to remain and work without fear of deportation.

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