Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves making music, cooking, and spending time with her husband, daughter, dogs, and cat.

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The Pulse
12:55 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

On World Hepatitis Day, An Invitation

Baby boomers are five times as likely to have chronic hepatitis C as any other age group. That's why the CDC launched a public health campaign to encourage boomers to get screened for the disease. And so, in honor of World Hepatitis Day, I invite---no, I encourage--boomers to get tested for hepatitis C. Why C and not the others? Because we've got effective vaccines for hepatitis A and B, but not for hepatitis C. So let's focus on that one. More information for boomers, below.

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Health Care
5:30 am
Fri July 25, 2014

WaterFire Lighting Spotlights Hepatitis C

This Saturday, WaterFire Providence is dedicated to raising awareness about hepatitis C. Organizers are offering free hepatitis C screenings at the event.

WaterFire volunteers will light more than eighty bonfires along the downtown river on Saturday night. A group called Rhode Island Defeats Hep C, led by Dr. Lynn Taylor, organized the lighting.

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The Pulse
2:56 pm
Wed July 23, 2014

Recovery "On Call" In the Emergency Room

A new program aims to connect people who have accidentally overdosed on opioids with addiction treatment – before they leave the emergency room. The state’s largest nonprofit mental health service organization, The Providence Center, is providing what it calls “recovery coaches” to Kent Hospital through a program called AnchorED.

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Health Care
4:16 pm
Tue July 22, 2014

Rhode Island Kids Rank 26th In Well-Being

Children are worse off in Rhode Island than in the rest of New England. But there are some bright spots in an annual report about kids’ well-being.

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Health Care
9:13 am
Tue July 22, 2014

Surge In Children Removed From Homes Due To Neglect Or Abuse In Rhode Island

A reported surge in the number of children removed from their homes because of abuse or neglect is raising concern across the state.  Addiction is a major cause.

Chris Dorval manages programs at an addiction treatment facility called Clinical Services of Rhode Island. Dorval says that over the past couple of years, he’s treated a growing number of clients whose children have been removed from their homes. But Dorval said he thinks there’s more to it than just the increasing number of people addicted to opioids like heroin and prescription painkillers.

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The Pulse
1:58 pm
Mon July 21, 2014

Neglect And The Developing Brain

For babies, healthy brain development is like a tennis game. A caregiver "serves" up an interaction, like a facial expression, a coo, or a word, and the infant "returns" that serve, imitating the expression or sound.

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The Pulse
2:24 pm
Thu July 10, 2014

Where ACA Dollars Have Flowed Into RI

CMS-funded innovation projects are taking place throughout Rhode Island.
Credit Screen shot / Centers for Medicare and Medicaid

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid have announced the second round of Health Care Innovation awards. These are big grants for projects that are trying to reduce the cost of health care and/or improve care delivery, often for some of the sickest or most complicated patients.

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Health Care
8:45 am
Thu July 10, 2014

How Rhode Island Is Doing In The Fight Against Lead Paint Poisoning

Hasbro Children's Hospital took part in the study of lead paint removal in partnership with Brown University.
Credit RIPR FILE

The U.S. outlawed lead paint in 1978. Yet it still covers the walls of many older homes, particularly here in the northeast. When that paint chips or peels, it poses a serious danger especially to kids. But in 2005, Rhode Island passed a law requiring some landlords to clean up lead paint. And a group of researchers recently set out to find out if it’s working. Hasbro Children’s Hospital pediatrician and Brown University school of public health associate professor doctor Patrick Vivier is one of those researchers.

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The Pulse
2:51 pm
Mon July 7, 2014

Getting The Lead Out: The Law Works, Except When It Doesn't

Cracking lead paint
Credit Bart Everson / Flickr

A law aimed at protecting children from unsafe levels of lead in their homes is working, according to a new study. But only when landlords comply with it.

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RI News
1:04 pm
Thu July 3, 2014

Thunderstorms Today, Ahead Of Arthur

Hurricane Arthur is churning towards New England. But forecasters are worried about an entirely different weather system hitting the area today. 

National Weather Service meteorologist Glenn Field is hunkering down for a busy day. This afternoon and evening, Field says he’s watching a cold front that’s on track to bring severe weather and a couple of inches of rain to Rhode Island.

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