Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

RIPR FILE

Health insurers are expected to file their plans for 2018 in May. They’re faced with uncertainty about how much to charge as federal lawmakers work on legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

RIPR File Photo

What’s happening in health care in Rhode Island, Feb. 28

UHIP: The House Oversight Committee continues hearings on UHIP Thursday, March 2 at the State House. On the agenda: delayed payments to long-term care providers. The state’s new public benefits system has been riddled with problems. Lawmakers say they want to keep an eye on progress fixing the troubled system and get to the bottom of what went wrong. The House Oversight Committee is chaired by Rep. Patricia Serpa (D-Warwick).

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Despite efforts to raise awareness and target groups at risk, overdose deaths continue to climb in Rhode Island. More than 320 Rhode Islanders died of opioid overdoses in 2016, compared to 290 in 2015. Soon after taking office, Governor Gina Raimondo convened a task force to reduce overdose deaths. Do they need to revisit their strategy?

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The ACLU of Rhode Island has reached a settlement with the state over the state’s failure to provide food stamps on time. The suit argued the rocky rollout of a new public benefits system caused thousands of households to be denied or face lengthy waits for their benefits.  

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The National Education Association of Rhode Island  is speaking out against President Donald Trump’s repeal of federal guidelines on school bathroom use for transgender students. The organization says it will stand behind transgender students’ choices.

NEARI president Larry Purtill says it’s important to remember that Trumps’ action does not undo legal protections for transgender students. And it may not have an immediate impact in Rhode Island.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s broken about Rhode Island’s mental health system and what would it take to fix the problems? 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Warwick Representative Patricia Serpa has requested that the state’s Auditor General conduct an audit of all payments to contractors involved in the public benefits computer system known as UHIP. Rhode Island Auditor General Dennis Hoyle has accepted her request according to a statement from the Rhode Island General Assembly.

Stanford University

Researchers at Brown University have helped advance a technology  that allows people to use a computer with nothing but brain power.  The project, dubbed BrainGate, is helping paralyzed people type faster and more accurately than ever before.

Missed any of our stories about Johnston, Rhode Island? Let us take you there in this special hour from one of the nation's most Italian-American  towns.

RIPR FILE

The bills are part of an effort to boost mental illness prevention and access to treatment. The Senate Health and Human Services Committee held a series of hearings last fall on the state of Rhode Island's mental health system. Lawmakers produced a report with several recommendations based on hours of testimony from health care providers, patients, and advocates.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Online health insurance marketplaces like Rhode Island’s HealthSource RI are a key feature of the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders buy health insurance plans through the exchange, and most receive some kind of federal subsidy to help pay for those plans. But Obamacare is under fire, and there’s a lot of uncertainty about these marketplaces. 


Kristin Gourlay / RIPR


Problems with the state’s new online public assistance system, UHIP, are much more significant than anyone realized. 

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo on Wednesday blamed state vendor Deloitte for delivering what she called a defective IT system for administering human service benefits. Raimondo also apologized to Rhode Islanders for ongoing problems with the Unified Health Infrastructure Project system.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A report on the roll out of the state’s new public benefits program, UHIP, is damning. The message: the problems are worse than we thought.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Feb. 14

VALENTINE’S DAY: Happy Valentine’s Day! Don’t forget to be good to your heart. Stop smoking. Exercise. Eat healthy food. And surround yourself with people you love and who love you.

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