Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island.

  • Eliminate Hep C in RI? Brown researchers project more treatment could reduce hepatitis C by 90% in Rhode Island by 2030.
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Kate Johnson has been a mentor to Denzel Negron for more than three years. They met through a program called “Real Connections,” run by Foster Forward.

Diabetes is on the rise across the country, but in Rhode Island, Latinos appear to face a greater risk.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins News Director Elisabeth Harrison to talk about her upcoming series on diabetes in Rhode Island's Latino community.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

CVS Health and pharmaceutical company Adapt Pharma have struck a deal to offer Narcan discounts to patients without insurance. Narcan is the opioid overdose rescue drug. 

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island:

Providence College

Providence College celebrates its centennial this year with a lineup of famous guests and special events. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Wednesday night State Police invited the public to tell them how to do their jobs better. More than 70 community members showed up at Roger Williams University's Providence campus to engage in that dialog. Police brutality was a top issue, but participants pointed to the bigger issue: racism.         


Executive Office of Health and Human Services

Rhode Island’s prison system is offering drug treatment to more inmates. Until now, only inmates who entered prison on medication for opioid addiction were allowed to continue that medication. And only for 60 days. Now, the Adult Correctional Institutions will continue medication for six months or longer, thanks to an infusion of cash in this year’s state budget. 

Cynthia Goldsmith / CDC

Here’s what’s happening in health in Rhode Island (for 7/19/16 - 7/26/16): federal drug czar visits, a new college at URI, community health grants, Zika funding, addiction treatment, a sports program for disabled veterans, and a health system merger proceeds, but not as quickly as the parties would like.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island’s waters teem with tasty fish. But we’re not eating most of them. That’s partly because much of it gets shipped overseas, and partly because Rhode Islanders just haven’t developed a taste for fish many consider trash – or “bycatch.” A group of chefs, scientists, and fishermen want to change that. 

Staff photo / RIPR

Rhode Island Senator Sheldon Whitehouse co-authored a major package of addiction legislation that just passed the House and Senate. It’s called the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, or CARA. And it addresses a range of issues, from preventing addiction among student athletes to helping veterans avoid incarceration. But many of the measures it authorizes have yet to be funded.

Help shape the stories for a new series from Rhode Island Public Radio. What keeps people in your community apart? Who is bridging divides such as race, class and politics to bring deeper understanding to your community? Have you formed a relationship that changed the way you see your friends, your neighbors or your family? We want to hear from you! 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

In the wake of recent mass and police shootings, Rhode Island Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse says Congress may be gearing up to consider more gun legislation. But, Whitehouse cautions that he has seen similar efforts fail before.

Whitehouse says he’s hopeful about legislation that would restrict people who are on anti-terrorism no-fly lists from buying guns. It's currently in limbo. Still, Whitehouse says the outlook is promising for gun control advocates.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island, including stories about addiction treatment, intellectual disabilities, medical marijuana, outdoor recreation, antibiotic resistance, and more:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Nutrition advice seems to change from one moment to the next – don’t eat fat, eat fat, don’t eat carbs, eat carbs. A new exhibit at Johnson and Wales University’s Culinary Museum takes us back to a time when those messages were just beginning to enter the modern world.

Pages