Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways to Connect

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo on Wednesday blamed state vendor Deloitte for delivering what she called a defective IT system for administering human service benefits. Raimondo also apologized to Rhode Islanders for ongoing problems with the Unified Health Infrastructure Project system.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A report on the roll out of the state’s new public benefits program, UHIP, is damning. The message: the problems are worse than we thought.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Feb. 14

VALENTINE’S DAY: Happy Valentine’s Day! Don’t forget to be good to your heart. Stop smoking. Exercise. Eat healthy food. And surround yourself with people you love and who love you.

RIPR FILE

HealthSource RI is wrapping up its open enrollment period amid uncertainty about the future of state-run health care exchanges under President Donald Trump. Signups are down slightly over last year.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

State representative Aaron Regunburg has been chairing a House committee on the use of solitary confinement in Rhode Island’s prisons. Solitary has been shown to damage mental health, and a high percentage of attempted suicides in prisons take place in solitary confinement. The question on the table: is this tool worth the cost to an inmate’s mental and physical health? 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Hundreds of millions of dollars have flowed into Rhode Island thanks to the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare. That money has helped people afford health insurance through HealthSource RI, cover more people under Medicaid than were previously eligible or signed up, and funded hospital innovation and public health programs.

At a joint hearing of the Senate Committees on Finance and Health and Human Services Tuesday evening, state health officials briefed lawmakers on what the law has accomplished in Rhode Island and what its loss could mean.

John Bender

At a time of increasing debate over racial, religious and political divides, Rhode Islanders share their experiences of reaching beyond the differences that keep many communities apart.

In this ongoing series, we meet people like Adewole Akinbi and Heather Gaydos, whose professional relationship has evolved into something more like family after the death of a co-worker. We also meet a former gang member, Jose Rodriguez, who has become friends with the Providence police officer who once hassled him on the streets.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State lawmakers introduced legislation Tuesday that would give Rhode Islander workers access to paid sick leave. Supporters say more than 40 percent of the state’s workforce doesn’t currently have this benefit.

The proposed bill would allow workers to earn one hour of paid sick leave for every 30 hours worked, for a total of seven days per year. The bill’s sponsor, Representative Aaron Regunberg, says the measure makes sense.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health care in Rhode Island, Feb. 7:

RIPR

State lawmakers plan a hearing Tuesday on the potential impacts of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Health officials, consumers, and insurers are among those scheduled to testify.

RI ACLU

The Rhode Island ACLU is demanding details from U.S. Customs and Border officials on how they are handling President Donald Trump’s travel ban. The move is a coordinated freedom of information request with multiple states.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Since President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel from seven Muslim-majority nations, many refugees are in limbo. They’re waiting abroad, and some of their family members are waiting for them here.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

If the Affordable Care Act is repealed without a replacement, hospitals in Rhode Island could take a hit. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Right across from the Johnston Town Hall is the home of the Autism Project, a nonprofit that helps kids with autism spectrum disorder learn to cope with their condition. 

File photo

Free bus rides for seniors and disabled Medicaid users end Wednesday. These riders will now pay fifty cents a ride. But the state Department of Elderly Affairs may be able to help offset some of the cost.

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