Kristin Gourlay

Health Care Reporter

Kristin Espeland Gourlay joined Rhode Island Public Radio in July 2012. Before arriving in Providence, Gourlay covered the environment for WFPL Louisville, KY’s NPR station. And prior to that, she was a reporter and host for Wyoming Public Radio.

Gourlay earned her MS from Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism and her BA in anthropology from Lewis & Clark College in Portland, OR.

She’s won multiple national, regional, and local awards for her reporting, and her work has aired on NPR and stations throughout the country. She’s particularly proud of the variety of protective clothing she’s had to wear on assignment, including helmets, waders, safety goggles, and snowshoes.

Originally from Chicago, IL, Gourlay loves music, cooking, and spending time with her family.

Ways To Connect

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket has won federal funding to train more primary care doctors. The program is focused on caring for kids in poor communities. And the hope is that trainees will decide to stay on after their residencies. The grant will help residents see more children in the hospital's family medicine clinics, add mental health services, and teach residents more about the social determinants of health.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins Elisabeth Harrison in the studio to talk about the growing importance of primary care in the health care industry.

Washington, Arlette Lum, and Hermes Ramírez / Fundación Almanaque Azul (Wikimedia Creative Commons license)

Smoking is now banned on Middletown’s town beaches. That makes nine towns and cities - out of 39 - that have passed ordinances to ban smoking on local beaches.

Taber Andrew Bain / Creative Commons license

Judging by the dozens and dozens of slogans you sent us, Rhode Island should top any tourist's bucket list.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Medicare has proposed a new rule that would allow doctors to bill for end-of-life conversations with patients. It’s part of Care New England nurse practitioner Terry Rochon’s job to have these sometimes lengthy, delicate discussions with patients, to document the kind of care they want as a serious illness progresses. But she says making advance care planning a billable service should encourage more healthcare providers to do the same.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Plans to establish a center where people can go to sober up, instead of the emergency room, have languished for lack of state funding. But a renewed effort to launch the program is underway.

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