Lynn Arditi

Healthcare Reporter

Arditi joins RIPR after more than three decades as a reporter, including 28 years at the Providence Journal, where she has covered a variety of beats, most recently health care. A native of New York City, she graduated from Oberlin College with a degree in government and has worked as a staff writer for The Center for Investigative Reporting in Washington, D.C. and as a reporter for the former Holyoke Transcript-Telegram in Massachusetts.

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Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Last week we met Rhode Islanders waiting outside the state Department of Human Services because of problems with benefits like food stamps and Medicaid. The shift to a new online system left thousands of people without the assistance they count on. One woman, Elizabeth Vanover, says doctors bills have been piling up since the state cut off her Medicaid.

Lynn Arditi

The start of the month is an important time for Son Sam, a 62-year-old grandmother. That’s when she gets her food stamps. But this month, she didn’t get any.

So, on the first Monday in December, Sam and scores of other people lined up outside the state Department of Human Services in Providence.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Job cuts often follow mergers, such as the deal for CVS Health to purchase the insurance company Aetna.  But CVS Chief Executive Officer Larry Merlo says this deal may be an exception.  

RIPR File Photo

The City of Providence wants to turn its fire departments into sanctuaries for people caught in the opioid epidemic. Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza made the announcement Monday.

John Phelan / CC BY 3.0

CVS Health’s chief executive says the Woonsocket-based company’s $69 billion bid to acquire health insurer Aetna will be good for consumers – and Rhode Island’s governor seems to agree.

But health industry experts say there are reasons to be skeptical.

Calmon1 / CC BY 3.0 Via Wikimedia

CVS Health has reportedly agreed to buy Aetna, the nation’s third-largest health insurer for $69-billion.

CVS is a lot more than a pharmacy. The Woonsocket-based company operates a giant retail chain – including 69 Rhode Island stores that sell everything from shampoo to potato chips. 

RIPR File Photo

The Rhode Island Department of Health has ordered Memorial Hospital to stop accepting emergency patients, new patients and performing surgeries, citing concerns for patient safety.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

A Superior Court judge has ordered the Rhode Island Attorney General’s Office to turn over documents on the troubled St. Joseph’s pension plan.  

RIPR

Care New England Health System reported a $47-million operating loss for the fiscal year, nearly half attributed to Memorial Hospital.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Virginia Iacono stood at the podium, a hospital bracelet around her wrist. She is 73 and undergoing cancer treatment at Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket.

“There are hundreds of us that rely on that cancer center,’’ she said. “Where are we gonna go…?” 

The Rhode Island Department of Health is seeking public input at a meeting Monday evening on Care New England Health System’s plan to close Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket.

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Care New England’s plan to relocate Brown University’s medical residency program to Kent Hospital in Warwick has some in the medical community breathing a sigh of relief.   

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Care New England Health System announced plans Tuesday to relocate Brown University’s medical residency programs to Kent Hospital in Warwick after Memorial Hospital in Pawtucket closes.

RIPR

Rhode Island has the ninth-highest rate of deaths in the nation from drugs, alcohol and suicides, according to a report released Tuesday by the Washington-based nonprofit, Trust for America’s Health.

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Uncertainty shrouds the future of Care New England Health System, which this week moved one step closer to closing Pawtucket Memorial Hospital when it stopped accepting patients into its intensive care unit.

But a top Care New England executive says Memorial employees can rest assured about one thing: their pension plan.

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