Lynn Arditi

Healthcare Reporter

Arditi joins RIPR after more than three decades as a reporter, including 28 years at the Providence Journal, where she has covered a variety of beats, most recently health care. A native of New York City, she graduated from Oberlin College with a degree in government and has worked as a staff writer for The Center for Investigative Reporting in Washington, D.C. and as a reporter for the former Holyoke Transcript-Telegram in Massachusetts.

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Two private foundations announced Thursday donations totaling $95,000 to support Rhode Island’s efforts to expand the state’s foster care system.

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A not-for-profit prisoners' rights group is suing Massachusetts Bristol County Sheriff’s Office for holding prisoners with serious mental illness in segregation cells.

CVS Health expects the new federal tax law will save the company more than $1 billion this year.

Lynn Arditi

The Rhode Island chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a second class-action lawsuit against the state over problems related to its public benefits system, known as UHIP.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

The normally bustling docks along New Bedford harbor were practically deserted Tuesday as an arctic cold front kept some boats off the water.

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Rhode Island health officials on Thursday approved Care New England’s plan to close Memorial Hospital’s emergency department, effectively shutting down the hospital.

The decision, effective Monday, includes a number of conditions – such as maintaining a walk-in clinic open seven days a week in Pawtucket -- designed to ensure services to area residents and off-set costs associated with transporting patients to other hospitals, according to a statement released by the state Department of Health.

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Care New England Health System and Massachusetts-based Partners HealthCare announced Wednesday that they have agreed to extend the deadline for reaching agreement on a proposed merger through January 2018.

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More than 5 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, including some 23,000 Rhode Islanders. 

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Rhode Islanders have until the end of the month to sign up for health coverage for 2018 under the Affordable Care Act.

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Accidental drug overdose deaths in Rhode Island fell 9 percent during the first eight months of this year, compared with the same period in 2016. Gov. Gina Raimondo called it a hopeful sign in the fight against opioid addiction and death. But she cautioned Rhode Island has a lot more work to do. Health Reporter Lynn Arditi and RIPR's Elisabeth Harrison break down the newly released data.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Care New England Health System will continue to employ as many as 200 people in Pawtucket after the planned closure of Memorial Hospital.   

RIPR File Photo

Rhode Island’s health director on Monday approved a request by Prime Healthcare Services to convert Landmark Medical Center back to nonprofit status.

The move enables Prime to avoid paying millions of dollars in property taxes to Woonsocket and North Smithfield, where the company runs an affiliated rehab hospital.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Last week we met Rhode Islanders waiting outside the state Department of Human Services because of problems with benefits like food stamps and Medicaid. The shift to a new online system left thousands of people without the assistance they count on. One woman, Elizabeth Vanover, says doctors bills have been piling up since the state cut off her Medicaid.

Lynn Arditi

The start of the month is an important time for Son Sam, a 62-year-old grandmother. That’s when she gets her food stamps. But this month, she didn’t get any.

So, on the first Monday in December, Sam and scores of other people lined up outside the state Department of Human Services in Providence.

Lynn Arditi / RIPR

Job cuts often follow mergers, such as the deal for CVS Health to purchase the insurance company Aetna.  But CVS Chief Executive Officer Larry Merlo says this deal may be an exception.  

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