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It's All Politics
5:22 pm
Tue March 24, 2015

Lessons In Moving Forward On Race From A 40-Year Mayor

"It's an intense job, you give it all, everyday, and I just don't want to get into another term where I say 'Gee, it would be nice to take it a little bit easier,'" Mayor Joe Riley says.
Richard Ellis Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 12:40 pm

It might not sound newsworthy that Charleston, S.C., is getting a new mayor next year. But the last time the city elected a new mayor was 40 years ago, in December 1975.

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Author Interviews
6:58 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

'Cheated' Out Of An Education: Book Replays UNC's Student-Athlete Scandal

UNC basketball fans storm the court after a win over Duke in 2014.
Grant Halverson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 10:47 am

March Madness is college basketball's annual shining moment, and few schools have shone as bright or as long as the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have been in 18 Final Fours and won the national championship five times, most recently in 2009.

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SXSW Music Festival
6:15 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

From Kate Tempest To Torres, Female Artists Shone At SXSW

The crowd was all smiles during NPR Music's showcase at this year's South By Southwest music festival. We can't send you back in time to hear the shows, but you can listen to some of Bob Boilen's favorite performers from the festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:16 pm

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Author Interviews
5:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

'13 Men,' No Clear Answers: Digging Into An Indian Gang Rape Case

In 13 Men journalist Sonia Faleiro chronicles the real-life case of "Baby" — a 20-year-old woman from the tribal village of Subalpur in West Bengal, India. Baby falls in love with a Muslim outsider and, she tells police, is gang-raped as punishment. Villagers maintain that Baby's story was fabricated.
Picasa Sonia Faleiro

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 1:26 pm

Last year, a 20-year-old woman left the Indian capital city of New Delhi and returned to the rural village where she grew up so she could take care of her sick mother.

The woman's name isn't public, but Sonia Faleiro — a journalist who's been investigating her case — calls her "Baby." She says Baby was known as a high-profile figure in her modest village.

"She became a somebody," Faleiro tells NPR's Kelly McEvers. "A landowner. An employed young woman. She had money to spend. And she refused to accept that she needed to be like everyone else."

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U.S.
5:23 pm
Sun March 22, 2015

Understanding Skid Row's Tensions After A Fatal Police Shooting

Many of LA's Skid Row residents live in makeshift tents.
Kelly McEvers

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 6:32 pm

Skid Row, in downtown Los Angeles, has long been known for its high concentration of homeless, drug- or alcohol-addicted and mentally ill residents. They live on the streets, in boxes and tents or in subsidized one-room apartments.

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World
6:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

After Students Went To Wage Jihad, Teacher Highlights Youth Radicalization

Lamya Kaddor teaches Islamic studies in Germany. She's written a new book, Zum Toeten Bereit (Ready To Kill), about the experience of having five former students flee to Syria to join jihadist groups.
Andre Zelck Courtesy of Piper Verlag GmbH

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 7:41 pm

Lamya Kaddor, a German-Syrian religious studies teacher and expert on Islam, was horrified to learn in 2013 that five of her former students had departed Germany to join jihadist groups in Syria.

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Author Interviews
6:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

Thanks To Chance (And Craigslist), A Writer Becomes A Carpenter

131Pixfoto iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue March 31, 2015 8:57 pm

Nina MacLaughlin always knew she wanted to be a writer. She studied English and classics in college, and after graduation, she landed a great job with Boston's weekly alternative newspaper, the Boston Phoenix.

But after a few years of editing the newspaper's website, the drudgery began to hit her. It involved so much clicking, she says, and so many empty hours scrolling through the Internet. It didn't feel like how she wanted to spend her life.

And then came the low point: web producing a "listicle" of the world's "100 Unsexiest Men."

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Music
6:27 pm
Sat March 21, 2015

'We Wanted To Entertain': Jon Spencer On 25 Years In New York

Jon Spencer Blues Explosion.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 8:21 pm

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion's new album, Freedom Tower: No Wave Dance Party 2015, is all about New York City. As leader Jon Spencer explains, it was time to pay homage to the city the band has called home for almost 25 years, even though his love for the place is complicated.

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Around the Nation
7:49 am
Sat March 21, 2015

The Definitive Road Trip? It's Data-Driven

Randy Olson's algorithm devised the optimal driving route to 50 tourist spots in the Lower 48 states.
Randy Olson

Originally published on Sat March 21, 2015 10:56 am

Spring is here, and a number of families are plotting road trips for school break.

Randy Olson, a Ph.D. candidate at Michigan State University and a self-proclaimed "data tinkerer," believes he's devised a route that could allow a family to hit a landmark in each of the Lower 48 states, from Grand Canyon in Arizona to the Gateway Arch in St. Louis to the Statue of Liberty in New York, in just nine days of driving.

"About 9.33 days, if you drove non-stop," Olson clarifies.

That means no time sleeping or using the restroom — and no bad traffic.

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Goats and Soda
5:29 am
Sat March 21, 2015

A Year Of Ebola: Memorable Moments From Our Reporters' Notebooks

Twins Watta and Fatta Balyon pose outside the home of their guardian Mamuedeh Kanneh in Barkedu, a village in Liberia.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Mon March 23, 2015 2:43 pm

It started in December 2013. A 2-year-old boy in Guinea was running a fever. He was vomiting. There was blood in his stool.

He was most likely "patient zero" — the first case in the Ebola outbreak that swept across West Africa.

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