Patrick Skahill

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011.
 
 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report.

 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

More and more ticks in Connecticut are testing positive for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. It’s a trend the head of the state’s tick-testing lab doesn’t see abating.

Danbury-based FuelCell Energy recently won a $1.5 million research grant from the Department of Energy. It’s money coming at a time when industry leaders are hopeful fuel cell technology will grow in the state.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In nature, fascinating biology can be found on the edges -- intermingled habitats where biodiversity can flourish. Reporter Patrick Skahill recently traveled to one such edge along Connecticut's shoreline, what’s called a “head of tide.”


Squirrel Nation / Flickr

Farmers in Connecticut are looking to turn cow manure into money and, they want your leftover food scraps too. That’s because a burgeoning technology called “anaerobic digestion ” can take that waste, and keep it out of landfills, while turning it into electricity and profit.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Thumb on the scaleloading the dice -- the English language is full of idioms for people who cheat the system.

If you’ve ever wondered why so many of those expressions invoke images of weights and measures, a good “rule of thumb” is to look back at New England’s colonial history, when standardizing the way we define our world today was a priority.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Three developers have submitted bids to sell offshore wind to Connecticut. That could mean big things for New London's economy, but officials and advocates said the state needs to act fast to ensure it doesn't miss the boat.

The manager of New England's power grid says for the first time ever, there are more proposals for new wind power projects than there are for natural gas. But getting those wind turbines up and running is a totally different ballgame.

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE / CREATIVE COMMONS

A massive solar project in Simsbury, Connecticut is now one step closer to becoming one of New England’s largest clean-energy projects.

KARIM D. GHANTOUS / CREATIVE COMMONS

Following the October storm that cut power to thousands of customers, researchers say it may be time to devise new models to predict storm outages. Emmanouil Anagnostou is a professor at the University of Connecticut. He says existing models do really well at building connections between historic and new storm data. But they’re not great at predicting more extreme weather events.

Patrick Shahill/WNPR

A giant, miles-long tunnel is about to be drilled hundreds of feet beneath Connecticut’s capital. This subterranean project will take years, cost hundreds of millions of dollars, and the hope is, result in cleaner water for the Connecticut River and Long Island Sound. A similar project has improved pollution but raised prices significantly for sewer customers in Rhode Island.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

As Kevin Sullivan slowly rumbles his pickup truck across his 60 acres of property near the Connecticut-Massachusetts border, he leans in and asks a question: What’s farmland?

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

  Honey bees have been having a tough time lately. Pests and disease have plagued many hives, killing off the pollinators and forcing people looking to save the bees to get creative.

REDPLANET89 / CC0 License

Deepwater Wind, the group behind the nation's first offshore wind farm, is now proposing a massive clean energy project in Connecticut. The company wants to build what could be one of region's largest solar farms in Simsbury.

Wikimedia Commons

An expert on insects is banking on more rain -- and a fungus -- to knock back populations of gypsy moths.

RYAN CARON KING / WNPR

  Once plentiful in New England’s rivers, native Atlantic salmon have since all but disappeared.

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