Sarah McCammon

Sarah McCammon worked for Iowa Public Radio as Morning Edition Host from January 2010 until December 2013.

If the election results of 2016 were really about rejecting the political establishment, then Congress didn't get the memo. After all, 97 percent of incumbents in the U.S. House of Representatives seeking re-election won even as national polls show overwhelming disapproval of Congress.

Opponents of abortion rights have long argued that public funds for services like cancer screenings and contraception should go solely to health clinics that don't provide abortions.

Vice President Pence came to the annual Gridiron Dinner looking ever-so-slightly underdressed.

"I thought I'd be OK wearing a black tie tonight," he joked. "Then Nancy Pelosi asked me to refill her coffee."

Wind power is the largest source of renewable energy in the United States. But a broad swath of the country has had no large, commercial wind farms — until now. A new one with 104 towers is up and running near Elizabeth City, N.C., where it spans 22,000 acres.

Cary Dixon's 29-year-old son has struggled with opioid abuse for years. At first, Dixon says, it was hard to know how to support him as he cycled through several rounds of treatment and incarceration. She says her life revolved around his addiction.

"It's kind of like you're on a parallel track with them," she says. "You wait for the next crisis; you wait for the next phone call. You're upset when you don't get a phone call. You're just — you're desperate, and you're in a state of fear and anxiety so much of the time."

Decorations are sparse at Recovery Point, a residential treatment center in Huntington, W.Va. That's why the bulletin board covered with photos of men stands out. The men spent time here, but didn't survive their addictions. They're all dead now.

"We keep a constant reminder in here for individuals who come into our detox facility. We have, 'But for the grace of God, there go I,'" says Executive Director Matt Boggs, pointing to the words on the board.

Marchers — many of them women — are descending on Washington, D.C., to send a message about abortion to the Trump administration and the Republican-led Congress.

If that sounds like déjà vu, it's not: What the organizers call the March for Life is a protest against legalized abortion, unlike the Women's March last week, which included support for abortion rights in its platform.

A different kind of march

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The abortion rate in the United States fell to its lowest level since the historic Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalized abortion nationwide, a new report finds.

The report by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion, puts the rate at 14.6 abortions per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15-44) in 2014. That's the lowest recorded rate since the Roe decision in 1973. The abortion rate has been declining for decades — down from a peak of 29.3 in 1980 and 1981.

Donald Trump may face a skeptical public as he prepares to take office, but his staunch supporters seem ready to back him regardless of what he does as president.

And they have a message for those upset with his victory: get over it.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

President-elect Donald Trump has made it clear that Vice President-elect Mike Pence will have a major role in governing. He recently tapped Pence to take over leadership of his transition planning from New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, and Pence spent the day Tuesday at Trump Tower as the two men select key members of their administration.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we want to turn now to the Trump campaign. Donald Trump was not backing off of his attacks.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

You know, not that long ago, Donald Trump was dismissing the polls that showed his campaign trailing behind Democrat Hillary Clinton.

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DONALD TRUMP: I don't believe the polls anymore. I don't believe them.

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