Scott MacKay

Political Analyst

With a B.A. in political science and history from the University of Vermont and a wealth of knowledge of local politics, it was a given that Scott MacKay would become a commentator for Rhode Island Public Radio's Political Roundtable.

As a former political reporter for The Providence Journal, MacKay has spent more than thirty years documenting the ins and outs of politics in Rhode Island and New England. MacKay is married to Dr. Staci Fisher, an infectious diseases specialist.

Follow Scott on Twitter: @ScotMackRI

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Scott Molloy, an emeritus professor at the University of Rhode Island, historian of all things Irish, author   and former Rhode Island labor leader, will lead the Providence St. Patrick’s Day parade as grand marshal.

Molloy was a longtime professor of labor and industrial relations at URI’s Schmidt Labor Research Center and has done voluminous research and written extensively about the Irish immigrant experience in the United States, and particularly Rhode Island.

Peter Franz / Flickr

A majority of University of Rhode Island students, faculty and staff support making the Kingston campus free of tobacco and electronic nicotine products.

RIPR

Top Rhode Island lawmakers are pushing legislation to rename T.F. Green Airport as Rhode Island International Airport, a shift designed to strengthen the Warwick airport’s recognition. 

Providence Preservation Society

Brown University plans to demolish several historic houses on Providence’s College Hill to make way for a new arts center. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay hopes the university hasn’t set this proposal in concrete.


RIPR FILE

In a split decision, The Rhode Island Supreme Court has decided that the state Retirement Board was entitled to question a tax-free disability pension paid to a former Cranston police officer who objected after his pension was cut by the state.

Classical High School, Providence’s by examination secondary school, is holding a 175th birthday party on March 20th.

The University of Rhode Island men’s basketball team continues to shine. In what has become a special season, the Dan Hurley-coached Rams are drawing national attention, always a plus in the run up to the NCAA tournament and March Madness.

URI is ranked 18th nationally in the Associated Press weekly poll and 19th in the USA Today Coaches poll. That puts Rhody on top of such perennial college basketball royalty as North Carolina (22nd in AP) and Kentucky (24th in AP).

Those of us of a certain age recall when Republicans were the party of fiscal responsibility and balanced budgets. They were guys who wore horn rimmed glasses, charcoal suits and skinny ties and went to the Rotary and Lions. On Sunday mornings, they were in church or on the golf course. They all liked Ike, except for a few National Review-reading conservatives who wanted smaller government and thought Eisenhower was running  a “Dime-store New Deal.”

RIPR file photo

The Rhode Island governors’ race is getting underway. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says the campaign’s negative start doesn’t bode well for voters seeking a serious discussion of state issues.


New Bedford Whaling Museum

As part of Rhode Island Public Radio's series One Square Mile: New Bedford, political analyst Scott MacKay reflects on the city's past, from whaling to textiles, to its role in the Underground Railroad.


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As the nation’s political elite was filing into the U.S. Capitol for President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was not among those taking her seat for the speech.

Creative Commons

Democrats from Washington, D.C.  to New England and beyond are hopeful about their electoral chances in this year’s midterms. But RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay cautions that the party must do more than embrace the Women’s March and Black Lives Matter movements.


RIPR File Photos

Advocates for low-income workers in recent years have pushed in legislatures across the nation for increasing the Earned Income Tax Credit. Now, Massachusetts Republican Gov. Charlie Baker in his budget proposal is asking the commonwealth’s lawmakers to increase the rate from 23 percent to 30 percent.

Flo Jonic

In a front-page story on Wednesday, The New York Times pointed out that school shootings have become so common that Tuesday’s shooting at a school in the small Kentucky town of Benton was one of 11 shootings involving school properties since Jan. 1st.

Cheryl Snead, CEO and president of Banneker Industries, long one of Rhode Island’s top women business executives and a strong advocate for women and minorities in business, died Monday after complications from a recent surgery. She was 59.

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