Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

A giant black hole located at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years from Earth has been caught on camera letting out not one, but two massive "burps" of highly charged particles.

It is the first time astronomers have viewed the phenomenon twice in the same black hole.

Images released Thursday and credited to the Hubble Space Telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory were presented at the American Astronomical Society's winter meeting in National Harbor, Md., outside Washington, D.C.

Thai Prime Minister Prayuth Chan-ocha — whose relations with the country's news media have included threatening journalists with execution (a joke, he explained later) — has found a new approach to dealing with uncomfortable questions: on Monday, he had a life-sized cardboard cutout of himself propped in front of reporters and walked away.

A top-secret multi-billion dollar U.S. spy satellite launched from Cape Canaveral on Sunday reportedly failed to separate from the upper stage of its SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket and never reached orbit.

In rare talks between the rival Koreas held at the shared border village of Panmunjom, the North has agreed to send athletes and a cheering squad to the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang next month.

Updated at 7:40 a.m. ET

The BBC's China editor, Carrie Gracie, a 30-year veteran of the network, has abruptly resigned her job in the Beijing bureau, accusing the network of promulgating a gender pay gap.

Gracie, who is fluent in Mandarin, said she stepped down as editor in China last week but would remain with the BBC, returning to her former post in the television newsroom in London "where I expect to be paid equally," she wrote in an open letter published in her blog.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched a top secret U.S. government payload into orbit, while returning its first-stage booster to the ground for reuse.

The Falcon lifted off at 8 p.m. ET Sunday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. As the first-stage of the Falcon returned to Earth for an upright landing, the upper stage lofted the mysterious Zuma, presumed to be a spy satellite or military communications satellite, into an undisclosed orbit.

Former New Jersey Gov. Brendan Byrne, who presided over the legalization of casino gambling in Atlantic City and nearly lost re-election after establishing the state's first income tax, has died at age 93.

The Democrat held New Jersey's highest office from 1974 to 1982. His death was announced by Gov. Chris Christie, a Republican who nonetheless acknowledged Byrne as a role model.

"Governor Byrne had an extraordinary career of public service," Christie said in a statement.

If you thought your MacBook or iPhone would be immune to the Meltdown and Spectre microprocessor flaws acknowledged earlier this week by Intel, you would be wrong.

The problems found in the chips could allow hackers to get access to passwords and other sensitive data stored on personal computers.

Security researchers have found serious vulnerabilities in chips made by Intel and other companies that, if exploited, could leave passwords and other sensitive data exposed.

Updated at 9:15 a.m. ET

Strong wind and heavy snow is arriving in the Northeast, as a major winter storm — being called a "bomb cyclone" by forecasters — runs up the U.S. East Coast.

Schools and offices have closed in many communities, and officials are urging people to stay off the roads if possible. Blizzard conditions are possible in some areas, according to forecasters with the National Weather Service.

If you live anywhere along the U.S. East Coast, brace yourself for what is about to come: a nor'easter that forecasters are calling a "bomb cyclone."

How much the storm affects the coast is contingent on a number of factors, most notably how far out to sea it tracks.

Updated at 1:55 a.m. ET

President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are once again publicly comparing the size of their respective nuclear arsenals, with the president tweeting that the U.S. "nuclear button" is "much bigger & more powerful" than the one controlled by Pyongyang.

Iran's Supreme leader Ali Khamenei, speaking for the first time since protests broke out in his country last week, accuses "enemies of Iran" of meddling in the country.

At least 21 people have been killed in the protests that broke out throughout cities across the country since last Thursday, over Iran's weak economy and rising food prices.

Pakistan says it is preparing a response to President Trump, who wrote in a New Year's Day tweet that Islamabad was giving Washington only "lies & deceit" in exchange for billions of dollars in U.S. aid.

In the tweet, Trump accused Pakistan – a key U.S. anti-terrorism ally — of taking American leaders for "fools" and providing terrorists from neighboring Afghanistan "safe haven."

In an apparent reference to the $33 billion in aid that Trump says the U.S. has "foolishly" given Pakistan over the past 15 years, he signed off his tweet: "No more!"

One of two Milwaukee-area girls charged in the 2014 attempted murder of a classmate to impress a fictional horror character known as "Slender Man" was sentenced Thursday to 25 years in a mental hospital.

Anissa Weier, 16, had pleaded guilty in August to being a party to attempted second-degree homicide. However, a jury agreed in September with her claim that she was not responsible for her actions because of mental illness.

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