Ximena Conde

Morning Edition Producer

Ximena started as RIPR's Morning Edition producer in January of 2017.  She researches, reports and produces stories you hear every morning.

She got her public radio bearings in Chicago, where she was a production assistant for the WFMT Radio Network where she helped out on classical music shows in development.

Ximena attended Rutgers University where she completed a B.S. in Supply Chain Management - best explained as "procurement and logistics."  A New York City native, her favorite state to live in is Rhode Island. 

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Michael Tipton / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

The Boston Celtics are now the top seed in the Eastern Conference for the first time since March 2011. This Sunday the Celtics tied the Cleveland Cavaliers for first place in the conference, but the Cavs lost their spot after losing to the San Antonio Spurs 103-74, Monday night. 

A McLin / CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE VIA FLICKR

Homeless advocates are protesting a Cranston ordinance that makes it illegal to panhandle. Advocates call the ban unconstitutional and argue that for some homeless people, panhandling is the only source of income. Demonstrators are gathering at an intersection near Garden City and are panhandling as a form of protest.  

Courtesy of Rhode Island Foundation

Three Rhode Island visual artists have been awarded $25,000 each from the Rhode Island Foundation.

RIPR FILE

The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management lifted its emergency shellfish closures Friday. The DEM reports parts of the Rhode Island Sound, lower Narragansett Bay, and lower Sakonnet River are no longer testing for high levels of domoic acid- a toxin harmful to humans.

Congerdesign / Creative Commons License Via Pixabay

State officials have released a draft of Rhode Island’s first comprehensive food plan. The strategy tackles food insecurity and seeks to market the state as a leader in various food industries.

Courtesy of MOWRI

Meals on Wheels Rhode Island leaders say their program could be severely limited under President Trump’s proposed budget.  Rhode Island’s MOW program gets 30 percent of its funding through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which could see an 18 percent cut under the president’s plan. But although proposed cuts raise concerns, this isn’t the first time the organization has experienced a funding scare.

Ximena Conde / RIPR

The city of Providence and the state’s Department of Corrections both appear on a list released by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security as being uncooperative with federal immigration enforcement.

The Rhode Island Department of Transportation has dropped its proposal for a transit center along Interstate 95 in Hopkinton.

Courtesy of Rhode Island Division Of Sheriffs

As the Rhode Island Division of Sheriffs continues accepting applications for their latest academy recruits, officials say they hope to pull from a wider group of candidates.

RIPR File Photo

The Rhode Island Turnpike and Bridge Authority says work on the Mount Hope Bridge and Sakonnet River Bridge could cause some delays.  

RIPR File Photo

The University of Rhode Island’s Watershed Watch is asking for volunteers to help monitor local waterways.  The citizen scientists are trained and provided the equipment to gather data on over 200 lakes, streams, and coastal waterways.

Alex Van / Creative Commons License Via Pixabay

The Providence Housing Authority is considering revisions to its admissions policies for convicted felons applying for public housing.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

After President Trump released his proposed budget, Rhode Island’s congressional delegation was quick to denounce various cuts that would affect the state.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

While New England was getting hit with a mix of high winds and snow Tuesday, Deepwater Wind was having a productive work day. The off-shore wind energy company got through the storm without any problems while capturing the maximum amount of energy it could- 30 megawatts.

Chris Potter / Wikimedia Commons

Some Providence youths accused of non-violent infractions will soon have an option other than going through the courts. The Providence City Council established a Juvenile Hearing Board (JHB) to help keep first-time offenders out of the justice system. Instead of going to court and serving time, a panel would prescribe incarceration alternatives. 

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