The Two-Way
9:50 am
Tue May 14, 2013

Russian Security Service Claims To Have Uncovered CIA Agent

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 7:09 pm

From Russia Today:

"Russia's counterintelligence agency has detained a CIA agent in Moscow trying to recruit an officer of the Russian secret service, the Federal Security Service (FSB) announced. The agent was operating under guise of career diplomat."

According to Reuters, the Russian foreign ministry has summoned U.S. Ambassador Michael McFaul for a discussion.

The BBC adds that:

"The alleged agent was held overnight before being released to U.S. officials, Russia's Federal Security Service said. He is said to have been working as a secretary at the U.S. embassy in Moscow. The man was reportedly arrested with a large sum of money, technical devices and written instructions for the agent he had tried to recruit."

Other news outlets have identified the alleged agent, but NPR has not independently confirmed his name or that he is in fact a CIA officer.

Update at 7:00 p.m. ET: Russia Declares Diplomat 'Persona Non Grata':

On Twitter, the Russian Foreign Ministry said Fogle has been declared "persona non grata" for "provocative actions in the spirit of the Cold War."

It also said it had summoned U.S. Ambassador Michael McFaul to make a formal statement of its position.

Update at 5:10 p.m. ET: Diplomat Ordered To Leave Russia:

The Associated Press says the diplomat, Ryan Fogle, has been ordered to leave Russia.

Update at 11:15 a.m. ET. No Comment From U.S. Ambassador:

The news about the alleged spy broke, NRP's Michele Kelemen notes, just as the U.S. ambassador to Moscow, Michael McFaul, was taking questions on Twitter about U.S.-Russian relations. "Many tweeted about this case, but McFaul refused to say anything about it," Michele tells our Newcast Desk.

Update at 9:45 a.m. ET: Russian authorities have released photos and documents showing the alleged agent. They've also identified him as Ryan Christopher Fogle. American officials have not yet commented.

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