All Things Considered

Melissa Block and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting has transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

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It's All Politics
5:08 pm
Sat October 11, 2014

Grandpa Jimmy Carter Casts A Shadow Over Ga. Governor's Race

Jason Carter, the eldest grandson of former President Jimmy Carter, is running to become Georgia's next governor.
Erik S. Lesser Landov

Originally published on Sun October 12, 2014 10:57 am

On Sunday, Jimmy Carter makes an appearance at a church in South Georgia alongside his eldest grandson, Jason. Jason Carter is the politician these days, a state senator, and is now making a bid for the governor's office.

Democrats haven't won that office in 16 years. Now, the younger Carter, a Democrat, is neck-and-neck with the Republican incumbent, Nathan Deal.

This March, on the last day of Georgia's legislative session, state Sen. Carter was allowed to take the podium as president of the Senate — a ceremonial turn for outgoing Senators.

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Parallels
5:43 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

Amid Tight Restrictions And Rubble, A Cement Shortage In Gaza

A Palestinian worker checks a truck loaded with bags of cement as it crosses into southern Gaza from Israel last year. Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects.
Said Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 13, 2014 5:15 pm

Gaza businessman Maher Abu Ghanema wants to rebuild his currency exchange shop in Gaza City, but because for years Israel has restricted cement supplies to only specific projects, it's been slow going.

"I need at least 3 tons of cement," says Ghanema, who after two weeks of effort found 1 ton. "Whatever we got is from the black market, and it costs four or five times higher than the original price. Plus, it's low-quality."

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This Week's Must Read
5:43 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

For This Baseball Season, Roger Angell Has Just The 'Ticket'

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 6:43 pm

"Most of us fans fall in love with baseball when we are children," writes Roger Angell. At any age, though, the ballgame is better with a friendly and knowledgeable companion. I can't think of a better one than Angell.

Now 94, he has written about baseball for over half a century, beginning when the New Yorker magazine sent him to spring training in 1962.

"I have covered this beat in haphazard fashion, following my own inclinations and interests," he writes in Season Ticket about the game in the mid-'80s.

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Parallels
5:40 pm
Fri October 10, 2014

43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

Groups of rural and community police arrive in the city of Iguala on Tuesday to help in the search for 43 students who disappeared after a confrontation with local police on Sept. 26.
Miguel Tovar/STF LatinContent/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri October 10, 2014 7:04 pm

On the second story of the municipal palace in Iguala, Mexico, Mayor Jose Luis Abarca occupied the large corner office. His wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda, head of the city's family welfare department, occupied the one right next door. From there, residents say, the two ruthlessly ruled over this city of 150,000 in the southern state of Guerrero. A national newspaper dubbed the duo the "imperial couple."

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Global Health
5:36 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

In Collecting And Cremating Ebola Victims, A Grim Public Service

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 8:28 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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New Boom
5:30 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Millennials Are Blue Now, But Party Allegiance Could Be Up For Grabs

Millennial focus group: Arturo Chang (from left), Shaza Loutfi, Alexa Graziolli, Stephen Crouch, Jessica Ramser. Not pictured: Ginger Gibson.
Rachel Lushinsky NPR

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 8:28 pm

This story is part of the New Boom series on millennials in America.

President Obama is holding a town hall meeting Thursday in California with a group he wants to mobilize for the midterm elections: millennial entrepreneurs. Millennials — young people ages 18-34 — are a key part of the Democratic coalition.

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Goats and Soda
5:16 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

Three Forlorn Presidents Bring Ebola Wish List To The World Bank

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited West Point in August, when the impoverished neighborhood was quarantined to prevent the spread of Ebola.
Tommy Trenchard for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 6:28 pm

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is a "tragedy not seen in modern times," said Sierra Leone's president Ernest Bai Koroma.

At the annual meeting of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank on Thursday, Koroma and the presidents of Guinea and Liberia are pleading with the international community for help battling the Ebola epidemic. In the three hardest-hit countries, the virus has already killed nearly 4,000 people.

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Science
6:13 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Climate Change Worsens Coastal Flooding From High Tides

Cindy Minnix waits for a bus in a flooded street on Oct. 18, 2012, in Miami Beach. A changing climate is making floods related to high tides more frequent, scientists say.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

A wave of high tides is expected to hit much of the East Coast this week. These special tides — king tides — occur a few times a year when the moon's orbit brings it close to the Earth.

But scientists say that lately, even normal tides throughout the year are pushing water higher up onto land. And that's causing headaches for people who live along coastlines.

As Bob Dylan might have put it, the tides, they are a changin'.

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Business
6:13 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Obama Proposal Could Extend Overtime Benefits To More Workers

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
5:24 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

Apple Says iOS Encryption Protects Privacy; FBI Raises Crime Fears

FBI Director James Comey says new encryption features allow people "to place themselves beyond the law."
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 9, 2014 9:58 am

The FBI and other law enforcement agencies are up in arms about new technology now available from Apple and soon to be released by Google.

The software encrypts the data on smartphones and other mobile devices so that not even the companies themselves will be able to access the information.

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