Fresh Air

Terry Gross

Opening the window on contemporary arts and issues with guests from worlds as diverse as literature and economics.

Composer ID: 
5187f698e1c8154c40356c79|5187f693e1c8154c40356c69

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Interviews
11:59 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Michael Apted, Aging With The '7 Up' Crew

Jackie, Lynn and Sue — pictured here at age 7 — are three of the children featured in the landmark 1964 documentary 7 Up. The series returns this year with 56 Up, checking in with a group of 14 men and women whose lives have been documented since they were kids.
First Run Features

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:40 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Feb. 5, 2013.

Every seven years since 1964, in what's known as the Up series, Granada Television has caught us up on the lives of 14 everyday people. The subjects of the documentary series were 7 years old when it began; in the latest installment, 56 Up, they are well into middle age.

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Interviews
11:57 am
Fri July 26, 2013

Tig Notaro On Going 'Live' About Her Life

Comedian Tig Notaro dealt with a cancer diagnosis the best way she knew how — with humor.
tignation.com

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:40 pm

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 8, 2012.

"Good evening, hello. I have cancer. How are you?"

That's how comedian Tig Notaro began her set at Largo in Los Angeles the day she was diagnosed with Stage 2 breast cancer. As she uttered those words to the audience, there was nervous laughter, weeping and total silence in response.

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Movie Reviews
11:57 am
Fri July 26, 2013

'Blue' Rhapsodies: Woody Allen, In Need Of New Tricks

Ginger's (Sally Hawkins) best moments happen while in the company of a persistent suitor named Al (Louis C.K.).
Merrick Morton Sony Classics

Originally published on Fri July 26, 2013 1:40 pm

Another year, another Woody Allen picture, and few agree on whether that's a good thing. For some, he hasn't made an interesting film since Husbands and Wives, maybe even Hannah and Her Sisters. Others think more recent morality plays like Match Point and comic parables like Midnight in Paris prove the old dog still hunts.

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Author Interviews
1:45 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

A Metro 'Revolution': Cities, Suburbs Do What Washington Can't

Philanthropic and business leaders have come together to revive the core of Detroit, which recently filed for federal bankruptcy protection.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:47 pm

When Detroit filed for federal bankruptcy protection last week, news accounts were filled with troubling stories of urban decay in the city: vast areas of vacant lots and abandoned houses, shuttered parks, nonworking streetlights and police response times close to an hour.

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Health Care
1:37 pm
Thu July 25, 2013

For Bioethicist With Ailing Spouse, End-Of-Life Issues Hit Home

Margaret Battin's husband, Brooke Hopkins, was left quadriplegic after he collided with an oncoming bicycle while cycling down a hill in Salt Lake City.
Courtesy of The New York Times

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 4:14 pm

After writing books and essays about end-of-life issues, and advocating for the right to die, bioethicist Margaret Battin is wrestling with the issue in her own family. Her husband, Brooke Hopkins, an English professor at the University of Utah, where she also teaches, broke his neck in a bicycle accident in 2008, leaving him with quadriplegia and dependent on life support technology. In order to breathe, he requires a ventilator some of the time and a diaphragmatic pacer all the time. He receives his nutrition through a feeding tube.

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Book Reviews
2:53 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

'My Lunches With Orson' Puts You At The Table With Welles

Central Press Getty Images

If you asked me to name my favorite movie scene, I'd choose the one in Citizen Kane when newspaper owner Charles Foster Kane steals his rivals' best reporters, then throws a party in his own honor. As musicians literally sing his praises, we watch Kane dance with chorus girls wearing a look of radiant delight. It's a moment bursting with promise and cockiness and joie de vivre, made all the more exuberant because Kane's pleasure is so obviously shared by Welles himself.

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Author Interviews
1:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

After WWII, Europe Was A 'Savage Continent' Of Devastation

In his latest book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe takes a look at Europe in the years directly following World War II.
Picador

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:59 pm

In the introduction to his book, Savage Continent, Keith Lowe writes:

Imagine a world without institutions. No governments. No school or universities. No access to any information. No banks. Money no longer has any worth. There are no shops, because no one has anything to sell. Law and order are virtually non-existent because there is no police force and no judiciary. Men with weapons roam the streets taking what they want. Women of all classes and ages prostitute themselves for food and protection.

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Author Interviews
2:18 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

A Reclusive Novelist Reckons With His Legacy '& Sons'

New York City's Central Park
AnnaNem iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:56 pm

At the center of David Gilbert's new novel & Sons is a famous and famously reclusive writer in the J.D. Salinger model. It's a book about the writer as author of books, and as the father of sons — sons who don't feel nearly as warmly toward him as readers do. When & Sons begins, the writer, Andrew Newbold Dyer — or A.N. Dyer as he's known to his readers — is nearing 80.

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Remembrances
12:43 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Carline Ray: A Pioneer For Women In Jazz Dies At 88

Carline Ray, who sang with The International Sweethearts of Rhythm and Mary Lou Williams died on July 18 at the age of 88.
Jazz Promo Services

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:56 pm

Pioneering musician Carline Ray died July 18 at age 88. In the 1940s, when it was difficult for women to be accepted as jazz musicians, Ray found a home in the all-female band The International Sweethearts of Rhythm as the guitarist and a featured vocalist. She was also a bass player who performed with Sy Oliver, Mercer Ellington and Mary Lou Williams.

Ray was born in Harlem in 1925 during the Harlem Renaissance. She graduated from Juilliard and the Manhattan School of Music. Her husband, Luis Russell, led his own band and worked as Louis Armstrong's music director.

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Middle East
2:14 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

Morsi's Ouster In Egypt: A 'Bookend' For The Arab Spring

In Cairo on July 17, supporters of the ousted president demonstrate for his reinstatement.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 2:17 pm

After covering the Egyptian revolution that overthrew President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, David Kirkpatrick has now been reporting on the military's ouster of Egypt's first democratically elected president, Mohammed Morsi of the Muslim Brotherhood.

Kirkpatrick, The New York Times' Cairo bureau chief, arrived in Egypt in January 2011, and days later flew to Tunisia to cover the revolution that launched the Arab Spring.

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