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Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

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NPR Story
5:15 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Kentucky Highlands Becomes Both 'Promise' And 'Empowerment' Zone

Earlier this month, parts of southeastern Kentucky were named a “Promise Zone” by President Obama. Twenty years ago, President Bill Clinton named neighboring parts of the Kentucky Highlands an “Empowerment Zone.”

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NPR Story
5:15 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

One Year In, Vine Has Reasons To Celebrate

Vine, the app that lets users create and share six-second videos, celebrated its first birthday recently. Vine is owned by Twitter and boasts 40 million users, including celebrities and politicians like President Obama.

It’s also created its own celebrities, including Nicolas Megalis whose video Gummy Money has 2.2 million “likes.”

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NPR Story
4:34 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

What Santa Does When Christmas Is Over

The Golden Corral sections off a private room to protect Santa’s identities from children. (Eric Mennel/WUNC)

Content Advisory: If Santa is real to your kids, this story may not be suitable for them.

It’s a month after Christmas, and in parts of the nation, the Santas are gathering for some rumination. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Phoebe Judge of WUNC has the story of what professional Santas do when Christmas is over.

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NPR Story
4:21 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Song Of The Week: 'Neon Fists' By Yellow Ostrich

Yellow Ostrich consists of Alex Schaaf (vocals and guitar), Michael Tapper (drums), Jared Van Fleet and Zach Rose. (Courtesy)

Every week, NPR Music writer and editor Stephen Thompson freshens our playlists with a new song.

This week he introduces Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti to the song “Neon Fists” by the Wisconsin-born, Brooklyn-based indie rock band Yellow Ostrich, off their forthcoming album “Cosmos.”

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NPR Story
4:21 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

Women And Children Most At Risk In Mississippi

Shae Hill holds her daughter Fredderio, 3 months, inside a store May 7, 2009 in Glendora, Mississippi. The highly impoverished rural town has very few jobs and no public transportation. The recession has hit many Americans hard, but the rural Lower Mississippi Delta region has had some of the nation's worst poverty for decades. (Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Fifty years after President Lyndon B. Johnson declared an “unconditional war on poverty,” Mississippi remains the poorest state in the nation.

Most advocates and economists say Johnson’s social programs such as Head Start and child care subsidies have made huge differences in the state and across the country, yet they’re not reaching most in need.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

The Grammy's 'Best New Artist' Nominees

The six trophies for Adele are displayed backstage at the 54th Grammy Awards in Los Angeles, California, February 12, 2012. (Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images)

The Grammy Awards ceremony is this Sunday, and there are five hopefuls in the Best New Artist category. Kasey Musgraves, Ed Sheeran, James Blake, Kendrick Lamar and Macklemore & Ryan Lewis are all nominated.

Los Angeles Times pop music writer Mikael Wood thinks Macklemore & Ryan Lewis will win handily.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

As North Carolina Grows, Public Education Shifts

A student holds a sign in support of teachers outside a demonstration at Durham's EK Powe Elementary School in November 2013. (Dave DeWitt/WUNC)

Major changes are happening in public education in North Carolina.

Last year, the legislature passed laws that did away with teacher tenure, ended extra pay for teachers who earn master’s degrees and created a voucher system for low-income students.

Analysts who watch education policy say no other state made more changes that affect schools in 2013 than North Carolina did.

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NPR Story
4:40 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Super Bowl Economics: NY May Profit More Than NJ

Next week’s Super Bowl XLVIII is expected to bring $600 million to the New York/New Jersey region, says the NFL. But how much of that will stay in New Jersey, the host city, isn’t clear.

Hotels and homeowners on both sides of the Hudson River are trying to profit as football fans come to the region to attend the game at MetLife Stadium.

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NPR Story
4:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Color Used In Many Sodas Contains Potential Carcinogen

A recent article in Consumer Reports says that the caramel color used to make most sodas brown, contains a potential carcinogen. One of the the worst offenders is the diet brand Pepsi One. (Brandon Warren/Flickr)

It may not be news that soda is unhealthy, but today, Consumer Reports is saying that in addition to the sugar and empty calories most soda consumers may worry about, they also should be concerned about the color of the soda.

Tests show that the caramel color used to make most sodas brown, contains a potential carcinogen, and one of the the worst offenders is the diet brand Pepsi One.

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NPR Story
4:41 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

'Sustainability' Is Big In Food Retail, But Hard To Prove

Whole Foods already employs a labeling system to identify the sustainability ratings of its seafood. The company plans to introduce a similar system for flowers and produce later this year. (Quim Gil/Flickr)

When you head to the supermarket, you have a lot of choices these days. You can choose from any number of brands, prices and labels. You can go organic, buy local, make sure your food is antibiotic free. And now you can add “sustainable” to the grocery list.

Retailers and restaurants like Whole Foods, Chipotle and Walmart are all providing information to consumers about how “sustainably” some of their products were produced. But it’s hard to know just what “sustainably” means and how to judge whether food was produced in a “sustainable” way.

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