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Weekdays, Noon - 2:00 PM
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

What Do We Have To Teach Plato?

A marble statue of ancient Greek philosopher Plato stands in front of the Athens Academy, in Athens. (Dimitri Messinis/AP)

In her book “Plato at the Googleplex: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Away,” philosopher and writer Rebecca Newberger Goldstein imagines Plato on a U.S. book tour, speaking at Google, on a cable TV show and debating child-rearing at the 92nd Street Y in New York City.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

Tension Remain High In Ukraine

In Kiev today, Vice President Joe Biden said Russia must stop talking and start acting to defuse the crisis in Crimea.

The vice president’s visit comes as three men killed in an attack on a pro-Russian camp on Sunday were buried.

The BBC’s Natalia Antelava is visiting the town of Lugansk, a pro-Russian stronghold, and reports on the debate between those loyal to Kiev and those loyal to Moscow.

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NPR Story
3:17 pm
Tue April 22, 2014

North Korea Steps Up Nuclear Activity Ahead Of Obama Visit

President Obama arrives in Japan on tomorrow amid reports that North Korea might carry out a fourth underground nuclear test to coincide with the president’s trip.

The reports about the possible test come from the South Korean Defense Ministry, which says it has spotted several activities related to a possible nuclear test in Punggye-ri in North Korea.

Jim Walsh, an expert on North Korea and international security, discusses this with Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson.

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NPR Story
2:57 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Remembering Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter

Rubin "Hurricane" Carter is pictured in February 2010. (Paul Kane/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:18 pm

Middleweight boxing champion Rubin “Hurricane” Carter died on Sunday at age 76. He was twice wrongly convicted in a 1966 triple murder. Celebrities rallied for his release, but after his second conviction, many fell away.

Thom Kidrin was among the few who kept up support and lobbied relentlessly for Carter’s release. In 1985, a federal judge ruled Carter had been wrongly convicted.

Kidrin joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to discuss his friend’s life and legacy.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

Song Of The Week: 'Animals'

The band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger consists of Sean Lennon and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl. (Courtesy of the artist)

NPR music writer and editor Stephen Thompson introduces Here & Now’s Robin Young to the song “Animals” by the band The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

The band consists of John Lennon’s son, Sean Lennon, and his girlfriend and fellow musician Charlotte Kemp Muhl.

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NPR Story
2:52 pm
Mon April 21, 2014

South Korean President Condemns Captain Of Sunken Ferry

Boats and cranes surround the site of the submerged 'Sewol' ferry off the coast of Jindo on April 21, 2014. (Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:09 pm

On Monday, South Korean President Park Geun-hye likened the actions and decisions of the captain and some of the crew members of the sunken ferry in Sewol as “unforgivable, murderous behavior.”

The disaster has left some 300 people missing or dead. Journalist Jason Strother joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson from Seoul with the latest.

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NPR Story
3:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Boston Is Ready To Run Again

The finish line of the Boston Marathon, located on Boylston Street, is seen on April 16, 2014 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Alex Trautwig/Getty Images)

One of the biggest fields ever will assemble in Hopkinton, Massachusetts, for the 118th Boston Marathon on Monday morning, which is Patriots’ Day in Massachusetts. It’s the first Boston Marathon since the bombings near the finish line last April.

This year, 36,000 people will be running, including elite athletes from all around the world. African runners have dominated the Boston Marathon for more than two decades and they are the favorites again this year.

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NPR Story
3:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Boston Marathon Inspires At Children's Cancer Clinic

A mural in MGH’s pediatric cancer clinic tells the story of the hospital’s marathon team, which was founded by Dr. Howard Weinstein, chief of MGH’s pediatric hematology-oncology program, in 1998. (Courtesy of MGH)

While the Boston Marathon will be the center of international attention this year, the marathon has always been a focal point at a Boston clinic that treats children with cancer.

For each of the past 16 marathons, many patients at the pediatric cancer program at Massachusetts General Hospital have been paired with runners — using the race’s symbol of endurance and strength to the youngsters undergoing cancer treatment.

Two former patients ran last year but were stopped before the finish line because of the bombings.

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NPR Story
3:24 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

First Embryonic Stem Cells Cloned From Adults

For the first time, scientists have successfully grown stem cells from adults using cloning techniques.

This development, published in Thursday’s online edition of the journal Cell Stem Cell, brings scientists closer to developing patient-specific lines of cells that can be used to treat medical ailments.

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NPR Story
3:12 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Jane Goodall Plants 'Seeds Of Hope'

Jane Goodall's new book "Seeds of Hope" is part memoir, part history of the plant world. (David Holloway)

Primatologist Jane Goodall is known for her groundbreaking work with the chimpanzees in Gombe National Park in Tanzania. But she also has a lifelong love of trees.

“To me, trees are living beings and they have their own sort of personalities,” she tells Here & Now’s Robin Young. “I’m not being scientific here, I’m just talking about the way it feels.”

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