Here and Now on RIPR

Weekdays, Noon - 2:00 PM
Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Ukulele Sensation Jake Shimabukuro

Ukulele virtuoso Jake Shimabukuro performs in the Here & Now studios. (Jesse Costa/Here & Now)

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 8:31 am

Jake Shimabukuro started playing ukulele at the age of 4 and soon fell in love with the instrument. As he tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson, ”My parents would have to take the ukulele away from me so that I would do things like my homework, eat dinner, or take a shower, you know I just loved it so much, every moment that I had free I wanted to strum the ukulele.”

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

'Heartbleed' Security Flaw Exposes Millions Of Passwords

Experts have discovered a major flaw in the security software used by millions of websites. “Heartbleed,” as the vulnerability has been dubbed, is a bug that affects OpenSSL, a software that operates about two-thirds of all web servers.

OpenSSL is behind many sites that collect personal or financial information such as passwords, credit card info and emails. Although researchers discovered the coding error last week, the problem has been present for more than two years.

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NPR Story
4:05 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

20 Injured In Stabbing At Pennsylvania High School

Nineteen students and a security guard were stabbed as the school day began today at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Penn., outside of Pittsburgh. They are expected to survive.

Authorities say a student wielding two knives went on a rampage down one hallway in the school and was tackled by the school principal. The student is now in custody and being questioned.

Deanna Garcia of public radio station WESA in Pittsburgh joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with the latest.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Debate Over 'Love Locks' On Paris Bridges

No one knows where this practice started, but hundreds of thousands of locks adorn bridges in Paris. (Carlo Occiena/Flickr)

“Love locks” can be found on bridges from Australia to Italy, and even in U.S. cities like Norfolk, Virginia. The padlocks are latched onto pedestrian bridges and inscribed with vows of love. The keys are tossed into the water below as an testament of unbreakable devotion.

No one knows where the practice started, but hundreds of thousands of these locks adorn bridges in Paris. Some say it was from the 2006 novel, “Ho Voglia Di Te” (I Want You), by Italian author Federico Moccia, while other believe it was at the Seoul Tower in Korea.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Bringing The Colorado River Back To Long-Dry Parts Of Mexico

An eight-week release of water from the Morelos Dam has filled parts of the Colorado River Delta that haven't seen water in nearly two decades, like this spot about 20 miles south of the dam. (Stina Sieg/KJZZ)

For the first time in almost 20 years, the Colorado River is flowing into northern Mexico through a dam that usually stops it. It’s called a pulse flow — a temporary release of water.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Stina Sieg of KJZZ traveled to see the effect it’s having on Mexico’s long-barren delta.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Water Crisis Not Over After West Virginia Chemical Spill

It’s been called one of the most serious episodes of drinking water contamination in U.S. history. Four months after thousands of gallons of the coal-washing chemical MCHM spilled from an unregulated above-ground storage tank into the Elk River, many people in and around Charleston, West Virginia, are still using bottled water.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Art Imitates Life For Transgender Artists

From the "Relationship" series, 2008–2013 by Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst. Courtesy of the artists and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles.

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 2:07 pm

The Whitney Biennial has been one of the art world’s hottest shows for new artists.

This year, artists Rhys Ernst and Zackary Drucker are grabbing attention with their photo series, “Relationship.”

The photos detail their developing relationship and their transitioning bodies, as each travels across the gender spectrum. Ernst is transitioning from female to male, while Drucker is transitioning from male to female.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Rwanda Marks Terrible Anniversary

Today, Rwanda and the world remember the beginning of one of the bloodiest periods in modern history.

It’s been 20 years since the Rwandan genocide resulted in the massacre of at least 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and moderate Hutus in just three months.

The BBC’s Prudent Nsengiyumva reports from Kigali.

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NPR Story
4:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Mystery Surrounding The Johnson Twins of Tennessee

Residents of Chattanooga, Tenn., are still puzzling over the mystery of Andrew Gary Johnson and Anthony Larry Johnson.

Police discovered the decayed bodies of the twin brothers in their home a little over a week ago. But investigators think the brothers — who were in their early 60s — died about three years ago.

How they died is a mystery.

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NPR Story
6:22 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Visit With Renowned Composer John Harbison

John Harbison is pictured at his home in Cambridge, Mass. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

In 2004, Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer John Harbison released “Songs America Loves To Sing – Old and New Music for Winds, Strings and Piano,” a compilation of recognizable choral preludes with a twist putting the spotlight on the true meanings of the work. It includes hymns like “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” and classics such as “Anniversary Song” — which we know as “Happy Birthday.”

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