This I Believe - Rhode Island

Wednesday at 6:45 AM, 8:45 AM and 5:45 PM

Credit Scott Indermaur

Hosted by Frederic Reamer

Modeled on the popular 1950s radio series of the same name hosted by Edward R. Murrow, This I Believe - Rhode Island, hosted by Frederic Reamer, is an effort to share the many stories of people of Rhode Island... the personal experiences that have helped form the opinions of your neighbors. This I Believe - Rhode Island is also an opportunity for you to share your own beliefs and experiences.

If you are interested in submitting an essay, please see our guidelines here.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Becoming a Teenager

May 27, 2014

Ah, the joys of growing up.  Looming independence.  Escaping the clutches of parental supervision.  Pursuing one’s dreams, no matter how fanciful.  And then, of course, reality manages to rear its head.  As the playwright Tom Stoppard said, “Age is a very high price to pay for maturity.”  But the wisest among us learn that even the dashed dreams of our lives as they unfold offer opportunities for wisdom, as we hear from a remarkably insightful 13-year-old, Jacob Wassouf.

Jacob Wassouf is a seventh grade student at the Gordon School in East Providence.  Jacob lives with his family in Bristol and reports that he recently completed his very first novel.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Stories

May 20, 2014

Every one of us has a story - make that lots of stories - that define who we are. There are those life-altering events during childhood, perhaps our first love or our first heartbreak, or the stories that come out of our adult lives that are so very complex. Some of us are eager to share our stories with anyone who will listen, but as Bill Harley reflects in this encore essay, others of us are much more quiet about the stories that shape our lives.

 

Bill Harley is a two-time Grammy award-winning artist who uses song and story to paint a vibrant picture of growing up, schooling, and family life. A longtime commentator for NPR's news program "All Things Considered" and recipient of the lifetime achievement award from the Rhode Island Council for the Humanities, Bill tours nationwide as an author, performing artist and keynote, speaker.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Violent Toys and Culture

May 13, 2014

All of us lament the violence that seems to saturate so many corners of our international and more personal worlds. Bullet exchanges in the Middle East, Central Asia, the south side of Chicago, and the south side of Providence. Sniper attacks.  School shootings. Stabbings that spring out of domestic violence.  And now cyber-bullying that, sadly, has led to a stunning number of adolescent suicides.  We know we want this madness to stop, and we want to know how it starts in the first place.  Dr. Joanna Brown has seen the fallout of violence up close, and has compelling thoughts about where some of it begins.

Joanna Brown is medical director at the Rhode Island Training School and also leads primary care innovation efforts out of the Brown University Family Medicine Department.  She lives in Providence with her spouse, Rebecca, and their two sons.

We’ve all heard and seen too many news stories about international horror: executions of political activists in China; imprisonment of visiting journalists in Sri Lanka and Pakistan; detention of dissenters in Myanmar and North Korea.  Torture and mind-numbing oppression are all too common throughout the globe.   For most of us, these are horrific news stories about true strangers; but for others of us, these gripping tales are deeply personal and hit much too close to home, as with Omar Bah.

Omar Bah is a Gambian journalist who was tortured and declared ‘wanted’ for writing about corruption and injustice in Gambia. He is the author of the book, Africa’s Hell on Earth.

This I Believe Rhode Island: Say When

Apr 29, 2014

All of us experience painful losses during the course of our lives.  The beloved family pet who dies after years of comforting companionship.  The dreadful breakup of a decades-long marriage.  The inevitable, but nonetheless agonizing, death of a nurturing parent.  At times these losses seem overwhelming and nearly impossible to bear.  Yet sometimes profound loss opens windows to new and remarkable insights and appreciations.  And that's what we hear from Bev Wright.

Bev Mondillo Wright  dedicated her life’s work to promoting public health.  After leaving her career recently, Wright now pursues her many passions – writing, above all.  She lives in Providence with her husband Steve.

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