The Pulse

The Pulse is written by Kristin Gourlay, an award winning health care reporter for Rhode Island Public Radio.

Full archive of The Pulse can be found here.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here’s what’s happening in health care in Rhode Island.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Dr. James Prochaska heads the Cancer Prevention Research Center at the University of Rhode island. Decades ago, while researching how people quit smoking, Prochaska began paying attention to the stages of behavior change.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island health officials estimate nearly 20,000 Rhode Islanders are addicted to opioids – whether prescription painkillers or heroin. But only a few thousand are receiving something called “medication assisted treatment.” 

Kathleen Gorman

Hundreds of thousands of Rhode  Islanders receive state assistance like food stamps and Medicaid. The agency that helps connect them with those benefits - the Department of Human Services - is in the midst of a major reorganization. 

Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling / RIPR

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates nearly a third of Americans are pre-diabetic. Many more are already diabetic. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health care in Rhode Island, including opposition to a proposed power plant, an Alzheimers study, fewer deer ticks, and remembering overdose victims.

Graphic: Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling

The rate of diabetes among Latinos in Rhode Island has shot up faster than any other group. Why the disparity in health between this group and others? It's a tangle of problems scientists don’t entirely understand.

Graphic: Benjamin Bouvier, Elliott Liebling

Diabetes rates are soaring across the nation. But in Rhode Island, the Hispanic population has seen the most dramatic increase of any other group over the past few years.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island.

  • Eliminate Hep C in RI? Brown researchers project more treatment could reduce hepatitis C by 90% in Rhode Island by 2030.

The Pulse: Scurvy Cropping Up In New England

Aug 4, 2016
Elisabeth Harrison

Poverty often leads to a poor diet, and poor diets can lead to a host of health problems. Doctors in Springfield, Massachusetts, think they've identified a diet-related condition that many thought disappeared hundreds of years ago.

Diabetes is on the rise across the country, but in Rhode Island, Latinos appear to face a greater risk.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Kristin Gourlay joins News Director Elisabeth Harrison to talk about her upcoming series on diabetes in Rhode Island's Latino community.

Here's what's happening in health in Rhode Island:

Karen Brown / NENC

The Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that up to 30 percent of former service members, from the Vietnam War to Iraq and Afghanistan, have Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Staff photo / RIPR

Rhode Island Senator Sheldon Whitehouse co-authored a major package of addiction legislation that just passed the House and Senate. It’s called the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, or CARA. And it addresses a range of issues, from preventing addiction among student athletes to helping veterans avoid incarceration. But many of the measures it authorizes have yet to be funded.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Nutrition advice seems to change from one moment to the next – don’t eat fat, eat fat, don’t eat carbs, eat carbs. A new exhibit at Johnson and Wales University’s Culinary Museum takes us back to a time when those messages were just beginning to enter the modern world.

Pages