1-195 Redevelopment Commission

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave debate property tax deals with attorney Nicholas Hemond, who works with the law firm Darrow-Everett. Their conversation includes efforts to standardize property tax breaks in Providence and spur development on the former I-195 land. 

When to listen:

You can hear The Bottom Line each Friday at 5:50pm.


Rhode Island’s General Assembly and Gov. Gina Raimondo have reached agreement on her first state budget. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on what the new budget will do and what it lacks.

The $8.7 billion state budget for the financial year that begins three days before the Bristol 4th of July parade  seems greased for approval at the Statehouse. As is usually the case, this spending and taxing plan contains elements Rhode Islanders should cheer yet   fails to address some of our little state’s crying needs.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

In a bold move, Senate Majority Leader Dominick Ruggerio (D-Providence) submitted legislation Thursday proposing tax stabilization standards for the 195 District in Providence.

Happy Memorial Day Weekend! Mea Culpa: Please see Number 1A (below). We're breaking from TGIF's usual format this week to look at key questions facing Rhode Island at the traditional start to summer. While the season of beaches and barbecues is generally a more relaxed time, a lot of significant outcomes hang in the balance. So thanks for stopping by. Feel free to share your thoughts and tips at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

Citing economic benefits, the foundation’s Board of Trustees have voted to endorse the proposed relocation of the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium to a new riverfront site in the 195 land in downtown Providence., according to executive director Dan Baudouin of the foundation.

The foundation, a business-backed non profit organization, stated in a news release that state and city officials should pursue a financial partnership that is "fair to all parties."

Ian Donnis

Dozens of protesters gathered Monday afternoon outside a meeting of the PawSox' owners and the Interstate-195 Redevelopment Commission.

The team is making its pitch for a stadium in downtown Providence with financial assistance from the state.

Gary Whitney, a North Kingstown resident who participated in the protest, said he doesn't believe any public money should be used for the project.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Boston Red Sox president and CEO Larry Lucchino, a managing partner of the Pawtucket Red Sox, was in Rhode Island to speak with the 195 District Commission Monday about the PawSox's proposal for a new stadium in ballpark. Lucchino sat down with me ahead of the commission's meeting to discuss the proposal.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In a letter sent Saturday, the Pawtucket Red Sox' new ownership requests a meeting with Governor Gina Raimondo "to consider various alternatives and explore ways to accomplish our mutual objective" of keeping the PawSox in Rhode Island with a Providence stadium, "including the possible purchase of the state land for the ballpark."

RIPR file photo

  The 195 Redevelopment Commission has decided to open to the public Monday’s meeting with the new owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox, who want to move the team from McCoy Stadium to a new ballpark that would be built on about 9 acres of former 195 land on the Providence riverfront.

Principal owners Larry Lucchino and James Skeffington are scheduled to discuss the stadium plans with commission members. The meeting was originally scheduled as an executive session that was to have been closed to the public.

After two snow-packed months, the apparent settling of the pension conflict, and Lincoln Chafee's surprising emergence as a possible presidential hopeful, Rhode Island confronts a sharp debate involving baseball, public dollars, and the future of the state. No pressure, right? Thanks, as always, for stopping by for my weekly column. Feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

The debate over Rhode Island taxpayer support for a new stadium for the PawSox in Providence has started. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay talks about state government’s next move.

Listening to the opening salvos in the Providence stadium debate reminds one of William Faulkner’s dictum about the American South: "The past is never dead. It isn’t even past.’’

The debate over the Pawtucket Red Sox and a public subsidy to help keep the team in Rhode Island began in earnest Wednesday as PawSox ownership unveiled their much-anticipated plan for a $70 million ballpark next to the Providence River. According to the proposal, a 30-year lease/sublease agreement would have a net cost to the state of about $2 million a year.

PawSox ownership said its proposal does not include issuing any bonds or public debt, and that the team will pay for the full cost of the design and construction of its envisioned 10,000 seat ballpark.

John Bender / RIPR

The owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox plan to unveil Wednesday afternoon their proposal for building a new ballpark in Providence. Some observers are excited about the move to bring professional baseball to Rhode Island’s capital city. Yet others are wary about using public dollars for a private enterprise. There’s also debate about using part of a site targeted for high-wage jobs.

Don Borman

  If the state gives financial incentives to Providence to move the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium to a new stadium to be built on the Providence waterfront, Pawtucket plans to seek state money to raze and redevelop McCoy.

That’s the word from Tony Pires, administration director for Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien, after a meeting today with members of the Pawtucket City Council and the General Assembly’s Pawtucket delegation.

A report from Worcester brings this unsurprising news: Members of the Worcester City Council want to study whether the city can lure the Pawtucket Red Sox to the central Massachusetts city.

Two city council members in Worcester have requested that the city work with the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce and other groups to try to get the PawSox to move to Worcester. The plan is scheduled to be debated at a council meeting tomorrow evening, according to a report from MassLive.com