2014 Democratic primary

Continuing the themes of her gubernatorial campaign, Gov. Gina Raimondo took office as Rhode Island’s first female governor this afternoon with a pledge to work diligently to improve the state’s struggling economy.

Raimondo, 43, a Rhodes Scholar and Harvard University graduate, projected optimism and a can-do attitude as she delivered her inaugural address under snow flurries and a January chill on the south steps of the State House.

Elorza, the Democratic mayoral nominee, has picked up two building trades union endorsements – Ironworkers Local 37 and the International Painters and Allied Trades District Council 11.

``Jorge understands the challenges working families face and he has a plan to create good-paying blue collar jobs in Providence,’’ said Scott Duhamel, business representative of UPAT District 11. ``Jorge will act with a sense of urgency to take Providence in a new direction that benefits every resident in every neighborhood. We look forward to helping him win on November 4.’’

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Rhode Island has been a laggard in electing women to high office. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay  on why that may change on November 4.

By most measures, Rhode Island is one of America’s most liberal and deepest blue of the 50 states. Our Washington, D.C. delegation is all-Democratic and no Republican holds any statewide or federal elected office.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The primaries are over and now it’s time for the main event. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses the Rhode Island campaign for governor.

Rhode Island voters will make history in November by choosing either Republican Allan Fung or Democrat Gina Raimondo as their next governor. Raimondo would be the first woman governor;  Fung would be the first Asian-American.

RIPR FILE

Every election has winners and losers. Yesterday’s Rhode Island primaries fit that mold on steroids.

On the Republican side, Cranston Mayor Allan Fung forged a comfortable win over Ken Block, the angry Barrington businessman. The GOP primary voters favored a mayor who had a record against an outsider who promised little more than putting the bully in Bully Pulpit and campaigned as if being governor was all about arousing public opinion to fight the Statehouse establishment.

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