2014 providence mayoral race

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Brett Smiley ended his Providence mayoral campaign Friday and threw his support behind fellow Democrat Jorge Elorza. The decision basically sets the stage for a head-to-head September 9th primary battle between Elorza and City Council President Michael Solomon, the acknowledged front-runner in the race.

Smiley's announcement came exactly 24 hours after his latest policy proposal, a road-improvement plan touted during a news conference near the Providence train station.

While pols and pundits lament the lack of competition in R.I. House elections across Rhode Island – almost half of all lawmakers are unopposed – that isn’t the case on Providence’s East Side House District 4.

The seat opened up after the incumbent, former House Speaker Gordon Fox, stepped away after his capitol office and home were raided by state and federal agents in March. Fox hasn’t been charged with any crimes yet, but he wisely decided against running again.

Three well-qualified Democrats are vying for their party’s nomination in the September 9 primary.

Aaron Read / RIPR

With three weeks to go, the Providence mayoral campaign is heating up. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on what to look for in the Democratic primary as the days dwindle down.

One of Rhode Island’s favorite spectator and participant sports has long been Providence mayor elections. A mélange of circus, street theater and rugby scrum, this year’s campaign is bound to land in the capital city’s political Hall of Fame, and perhaps, shame.

State Rep. Edie Ajello, D-Providence, a veteran Democratic East Side lawmaker, says that former Democratic Mayor Joseph Paolino Jr., was behind recruiting a candidate to run against her in the September 9 Democratic primary.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

The televised air wars have started in the Democratic primary for governor. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders if voters are paying attention yet.

As the weeks dwindle towards the September primary, the advertising rhetoric among the major Democratic candidates has heated up. This is especially true of the campaigns of Providence Mayor Angel Taveras and General Treasurer Gina Raimondo.

RIPR FILE

Just when you thought you knew the candidate field in the Providence mayoral campaign, things changed. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay’s thoughts on the capital city’s revised City Hall election.

Another week, another new twist in the Providence mayor campaign. The departure of independent Lorne Adrain from the race has set off a scramble for his supporters, most of whom hail from his home neighborhood on the city’s affluent East Side.

A plan set for release Thursday morning by Providence mayoral candidate Jorge Elorza targets a goal of doubling exports through the Port of Providence over five years -- a move, he says, that could add between 1,500 and 1,600 jobs.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Buddy Cianci says he anticipated when he jumped into the Providence mayoral race last month that it would ultimately become a two-man fight.

"I always anticipated a two-man race when I made the decision to come into the field," Cianci, who is running as an independent, tells RIPR.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

In a move to strengthen support beyond his East Side base, Providence mayoral candidate Brett Smiley unveiled an endorsement Wednesday by state Representative Ray Hull (D-Providence), a 28-year Providence police officer who lives in the same ward as rival candidate Michael Solomon and was formerly a driver for Buddy Cianci.

During a news conference at his home in the city's Mount Pleasant section, Hull said he decided to back Smiley over the two other leading Democrats, Solomon and Jorge Elorza, because of the East Sider's public safety plan.

Happy Independence Day! Thanks for stopping by for my Friday column. Feel free to share your tips via idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org and to follow me on the twitters. Without further ado, and with a lot more political fireworks on the way, let's get going.

Just another nice quiet week here in the Biggest Little, right? Thanks for stopping by and welcome back to my Friday column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome via idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me all week long on the twitters. Let's get to it.

RIPR FILE

So Buddy Cianci is back in the campaign for Providence mayor. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay reminds us that he isn’t the only candidate.

Every newsroom used to have a crusty city editor who berated young reporters. Mine was a revered Providence Journal editor named Al Johnson who barked, ``put them in the ambulance before you take them to the hospital’’ when he wanted a story about a car accident.

Heeeee’s back: Vincent A. `Buddy’ Cianci Jr., made official this afternoon what he has been talking about  for months,  that he will try for a Lazarus-like, unprecedented third comeback as Providence mayor, this time as an independent.

Providence’s Ward 11 Democratic Committee unanimously endorsed City Council President Michael Solomon for mayor and denied incumbent Council member Davian Sanchez an endorsement for reelection.

The committee gave the Ward 11 nod for city council to a political newcomer, Mary Kay Harris. The action came at a meeting last night where both Sanchez and Harris were interviewed by the committee, which represents Democrats in the ward on the city’s South Side, according to a statement  released by Joe Vileno, chairman of the ward committee.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

After claiming not to have his mind made up before taking to the airwaves for his afternoon talk show, 73-year-old Vincent A. "Buddy" Cianci Jr. revealed Wednesday he's staging an improbable comeback to become the next mayor of Providence.

Cianci is running as an independent -- the same approach he used during his 1990 return to power  -- in a close three-way race, after having first won office in 1974 as a Republican.

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