2014 RI elections

Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Islanders go to the polls in less than a week. Their choices, the state’s new leaders, will have to contend with the state’s budget shortfall. A huge chunk of that budget goes to health care.  

So, as part of our Rhody Votes ’14 coverage, Rhode Island Public Radio health care reporter Kristin Gourlay asks some of the state’s top health care stakeholders what steps those newly elected leaders can take to help.

        

RIPR FILE

The major candidates for Rhode Island governor have spent much of their campaigns focused on the economy. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay on what they aren’t telling voters.

All of the Rhode Island political campaigns this year are talking about our state’s sluggish economy. In the governor’s contest between Republican Allan Fung, the Cranston mayor, and Democrat Gina Raimondo, the state treasurer, jobs and the economy often seem to be the only topic.

Ernie Almonte, independent candidate for general treasurer, has picked up two union endorsements – the R.I. State Association of Fire Fighters and the R.I. Brotherhood of Correctional Officers.

``I am honored to be endorsed by Rhode Island fire fighters and correctional officers,’’ said Almonte, in a statement. ``As treasurer I will work tirelessly to restore confidence in Rhode Island’s finances and ensure those who have dutifully paid into their pension plans never have to worry about their retirement hanging in jeopardy.’’

Tomorrow is primary election day in the Ocean State. More than 700,000 of us are registered to vote. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay worries that too many won’t show up. (This is Scott's essay that airs Monday on RIPR).

Election Day was once a grand pageant. It was both spectator and participant sport. In the words  of Theodore White, the noted chronicler of mid-20th century American politics, decision day was a ``great stirring.’’

RIPR FILE

You may be fed up with Rhode Island politics. But RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says now is no time for Rhode Islanders to retreat into a cocoon of apathy.

It’s the high season of summer in our corner of southeastern New England. A time of blue skies, fluffy whipped cream clouds and sun-washed surf. It’s what many of us consider our best season. Proust had his madeleines. Rhode Island natives have our childhood memories stirred by plates stacked high with steamers, saugys and clambakes on the beach.