2018 General Assembly Races

Moira Walsh

After a backlash that attracted national attenion, the Rhode Island Democratic Party has rescinded endorsements for two primary candidates, including one for a former Republican who supported Donald Trump in 2016.

Summer is here, the General Assembly has adjourned and the political news keeps coming fast and furious. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The filing deadline to declare a campaign for public office in Rhode Island passed at 4 p.m. Thursday. But final details have not yet been filed by cities and towns with the Secretary of State's office, so information is incomplete at this point.

This report will be expanded as more details become available.

Here are some highlights from what we do know:

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Cranston Republican Steve Frias -- who almost scored a remarkable upset in 2016, coming within 85 votes of defeating House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello -- announced Monday that he's taking another shot at ousting one of Rhode Island's most powerful politicians.

"The race presents a choice between Speaker Mattiello, Rhode Island’s most powerful State House politician, and Frias, an articulate advocate for the taxpayers and for reform in Rhode Island’s government," Frias said in a statement.

The Rhode Island House budget vote is monkeying with our column-writing schedule, so this week's TGIF is a bit abbreviated. But we're still checking the pulse of Ocean State politics and appreciate your stopping by. Your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

RIPR File Photo

Americans have jousted over abortion for decades. Some supporters of abortion rights thought the 1973 Roe vs. Wade Supreme Court decision that permitted legal abortions would end the debate. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says they were wrong.

The May Revenue Estimating Conference is in the books, signaling the beginning of the end of the legislative session, and all the excitement that comes with that. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Just another ho-hum week in Rhode Island politics, right? The news emerged fast and furious Wednesday, in a likely harbinger of a lot more drama in the months to come. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

RIPR

Last week’s Rhode Island political developments among both Democrats and Republicans shook up the 2018 political campaigns. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay analyzes the new landscape.


Chapel Grille is the place to be, right? The Cranston restaurant has emerged as a hot spot for political parlays, with uncertain fallout moving forward. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As usual your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.  

Lynch & Pine

William Lynch, a longtime former chairman of the Rhode Island Democratic Party, is considering running for the District 8 state Senate left vacant by the resignation Tuesday of James E. Doyle II, Rhode Island Public Radio has learned.

Doyle, a Democrat first elected in 2004, said he was stepping down due to a personal struggle with alcohol.

Matthew Fecteau, who came close to defeating Doyle in 2016, has already announced a campaign for the Pawtucket-based Senate seat.

Elisabeth Harrison

Rhode Island lawmakers return to the Statehouse Tuesday for the start of the 2018 legislative session.

More proof positive this week that Rhode Island politics *is* the gift that keeps on giving. So thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Without further ado, here we go.

Rhode Island inexorably moves toward a fresh campaign season as we leave summer behind. So thanks for stopping by. As usual, your tips and comments are welcome, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.