38 Studios

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A legislative committee plans to continue its examination of 38 Studios Tuesday. The latest oversight hearings were sparked by the release of a trove of documents related to the failed video game company.

The committee is slated to continue a presentation on the timeline of events leading to the state’s investment in 38 Studios.

State Rep. Cale Keable (D-Burrillville), chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, joins Political Roundtable to discuss the debate over truck tolls, 38 Studios, and legalizing marijuana.

RIPR FILE

The House Oversight committee meets Tuesday for yet another round of hearings into the defunct video game company 38 Studios. The hearings come after the release of thousands of documents related to the state’s lawsuit with the company.

Among the major takeaways, the documents revealed some lawmakers may have known about a potential 38 Studios deal months before previously acknowledged. At Tuesday’s meeting the house oversight committee will receive an updated timeline of events.

Happy mid-October and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are always welcome via email, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go

Congressman David Cicilline takes part in Bonus Q&A this week to discuss a wide range of issues, including the conflict in Syria, whether there should be an outside investigation of 38 Studios, when he last spoke with Gordon Fox, Wall Street regulation and more.

State Rep. Patricia Morgan (R-West Warwick), deputy minority leader in the House, stopped by our studio to talk about a variety of issues facing the state.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

A coalition of five advocacy groups wants Rhode Island lawmakers to declare whether or not they support thorough legislative hearings and an outside investigation to document what went wrong with 38 Studios.

Hurricane Joaquin blows toward Rhode Island as the state remains vexed by its own ring of challenges: the hangover of 38 Studios, trying to modernize state agencies, financially troubled fire districts, you name it. Thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As always your tips and thoughts are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The recent 38 Studios lawsuit disclosures have provided an inside view of how Rhode Island state government let you down. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay points to other state agencies in dire need of oversight.

Phil West, the longtime former director of Common Cause of Rhode Island, joins Bonus Q+A to talk about fallout from 38 Studios, the fight for better government, criminal-justice reform, and much more.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Longtime former Common Cause of Rhode Island head Phil West joins Political Roundtable to discuss the fallout from the release of thousands of pages of 38 Studios court documents.

RIPR FILE

A former House Finance chairman is downplaying his role in the loan program used to lure 38 Studios to Rhode Island in 2010. Steve Costantino now serves as a publicly funded health insurance program in Vermont.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

The 38 Studios lawsuit disclosures have once again cast a cloud over the Rhode Island Statehouse. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders when Rhode Islanders will finally be fed up enough to bring change to Smith Hill.

There will be a day when Rhode Island moves beyond 38 Studios, but that day is a long time off. The public release Thursday of tens of thousands of pages of documents is just one more step toward trying to get a better understanding of Rhode Island's most recent scandal. So with that in mind, thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. Your tips and thoughts are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me all week on the twitters. Here we go.

John Bender

Former Gov. Lincoln Chafee, now seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, weighed in this afternoon on the release of the 38 Studios court documents.

It was Chafee, a vigorous opponent of the 38 Studios deal when he was running for governor in 2010, who later hired lawyer Max Wistow to file suit against principals in the deal. 38 Studios went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers holding the bag for $75 million in state-backed bonds to the company run by former Boston Red Sox star pitcher Curt Schilling.

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