38 Studios

Last Friday marked the three-month anniversary of the bankruptcy filing of 38 Studios. That makes it a good time to assess how some of the main players in that debacle are faring:


You can’t make this stuff up.

Summer Camp Studios, co-founded by Rich Gallup (formerly of 38 Studios), has released a video game that centers on farting felines.

PockerGamer reports:

Some members of the local fourth estate think former Governor Don Carcieri will seek a sympathetic audience — a talk radio host, for example — when he breaks his silence on the state’s disastrous involvement with 38 Studios.

But state Republican chairman Mark Zaccaria believes Carcieri will make himself available to a range of media.

Keith Stokes, who lost his job at the state Economic Development Corporation in the aftermath of the meltdown at 38 Studios, started a new gig yesterday: president of strategic economic planning & development at the Mayforth Group.

Here’s the release from the office of Governor Lincoln Chafee:

Governor Lincoln D. Chafee today announced that attorney Richard J. Land will serve as 38 Studios’ Receiver as the Governor and the State of Rhode Island work to recoup as many taxpayer dollars as possible. Mr. Land has served as a court-appointed Receiver for a variety of businesses and has represented clients in all levels of state court in Rhode Island, in the United States District Court for the District of Rhode Island, and the United State Bankruptcy Court for the District of Rhode Island.

Jason Schwartz, who wrote the definitive story on the 38 Studios saga for Boston Magazine, tells NECN the short version is this: the company “never really had a chance.”

House Speaker Gordon Fox yesterday sent a check for $648 to Tazza Caffe cover the cost of food and drinks for a 2007 fundraiser at the Peerless Lofts. Tazza’s owner, Michael Corso, is the lawyer and tax broker who was part of a 2010 meeting paving the way for 38 Studios to come to Rhode Island.

Now comes Boston Magazine with an in-depth dissection of Curt Schilling’s 38 Studios video game fiasco that has snared Rhode Island taxpayers to the tune of at least $75 million. The article by Jason Schwartz details the mess that was 38 Studios long before the arrival of the $75 million in financing from Rhode Island taxpayers that was pushed by Gov. Donald Carcieri and approved by the General Assembly and the RI Economic Development Corporation.

Governor Lincoln Chafee says he’s vindicated by testimony offered yesterday during a meeting in Wilmington, Delaware, on the bankruptcy of Curt Schilling’s failed video game company, 38 Studios.

Despite repeated and sustained requests for interviews from a bevy of Rhode Island news organizations, Curt Schilling and his wife Shonda continue to utilize Facebook to fire back at reports emanating from the Ocean State.

House Speaker Gordon Fox is distancing himself from responsibility for the demise of 38 Studios.

Lawyer Max Wistow, a partner in the Providence firm of Wistow & Barylick, was hired by the state today to try to reduce the roughly $100 million liability faced by taxpayers due to the meltdown of 38 Studios.

After being introduced by Governor Chafee during a Statehouse news conference, Wistow said he couldn’t offer specifics on his approach since he’d just started on the job as a special counsel for the state Economic Development Corporation.

Curt Schilling took to the sports talk airwaves last Thursday to once again blame Governor Lincoln Chafee for the collapse of his 38 Studios video game company.

As usual, the washed up Red Sox pitcher tried to deflect blame from his wrongheaded leadership of the nascent company and shift responsibility to Chafee and R.I. state government.

The crash of the 38 Studios-Curt Schilling video game deal has sent shivers through Rhode Island’s economic development efforts. RIPR’s Scott MacKay has some thoughts on how we can get our jobs mojo back.

It is bad enough that Rhode Island state government has become a national laughingstock and media piñata for the foolish $75 million taxpayer bet on Red Sox legend Schilling’s ill-fated video game foray.

House Speaker Gordon Fox cut a comfortable figure on the rostrum last night as the chamber made its way through another mind-numbing 12-hour budget debate, adjourning shortly before 4 am with an $8.1 billion spending plan.

When Representative Daniel Gordon invoked Moses (“Let my people go!” Gordon said, in a protest of possible tolls on the Sakonnet River Bridge, Fox had a game response. “Should I touch this?” Fox said to rippling laughter from the reps. ”Because, Representative Gordon, if you truly can channel Moses and you can part those seas, we don’t even need the bridges!”