38 Studios

Ian Donnis / RIPR

During a closed session on June 9, 2010, the board of Rhode Island's Economic Development Corporation received a briefing on what then-Governor Don Carcieri suggested was a "fairly significant transaction" that had presented itself to the EDC.

Happy Friday, and thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. 

Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein declined Friday to order the release of a fraction of the documents considered peripheral to the state’s lawsuit over 38 Studios. The documents most central to the lawsuit are expected to be made public next week.

Banking giant Wells Fargo objected to the release of about 8 percent of the documents it produced in discovery during the lawsuit over 38 Studios. Silverstein indicated he agreed with the company’s argument that releasing the material could help Wells Fargo’s competitors.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR file photo

House Minority Leader Brian Newberry (R-North Smithfield) joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss Governor Gina Raimondo's changes at the state Department of Transportation; Raimondo's unresolved truck-toll proposal; and whether there's justification to keep confidential some of the 38 Studios documents.

For more Newberry, listen to his appearance on our Bonus Q+A.

RIPR file photo

Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein has slated two hearings, starting next Tuesday, on whether to keep confidential some of the documents related to the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios.

It is not clear why Silverstein decided to take this step. Court Clerk Henry S. Kinch Jr. says the judge is trying to get consensus from the different parties in the case.

"He’s really focused on getting as much of the material that is agreed upon to be released," Kinch said. "That’s what he’s trying to do here."

RIPR file photo

Court officials met throughout the morning Monday without reaching a decision on how to distribute thousands upon thousands of pages of documents from the state's lawsuit over failed video-game maker 38 Studios.

Superior Court Clerk Henry S. Kinch Jr. said the talks will continue, although it remains unclear for now when a process for making the information public will be established.

A summer slowdown of news? Rhode Island's summer of 2015 will likely be remembered for two important releases of information -- the State Police report on Cranston Mayor Allan Fung, and, more significantly, the unsealing of documents in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios. As always, feel free to drop me a tip or your comments, and to follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

RIPR file photo

All the currently sealed court documents in the state's lawsuit over 38 Studios will be made public, Judge Michael Silverstein said Friday, although the timing of the release remains unclear for now.

A status hearing in the state’s lawsuit over the failure of video game company 38 Studios is slated for Friday. The topics will include a proposed settlement involving some of the defendants.

The state announced earlier this month it reached a $12 .5 million settlement with four of the 38 Studios defendants. A judge has to approve the deal for it to go forward.

Some of the defendants who have yet to settle, including former 38 Studios owner Curt Schilling, are objecting to the settlement. The reasons for that have not yet been made public.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Physician, educator and talk-show host Pablo Rodriguez joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss the debate over the HPV vaccine; the outlook for Donald Trump; whether court documents related to 38 Studios should be unsealed; and the latest on the PawSox.

Old stories have a way of cycling back into the news in Rhode Island, and this otherwise quiet week was a case in point. So thanks for stopping by for my weekly column. As always, your tips and thoughts are welcome at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Ian Donnis / RINPR

State Rep. Joseph McNamara (D-Warwick), chairman of the Rhode Island Democratic Party, joins Political Roundtable this week to discuss new revelations about 38 Studios; an apparent slowdown in the path to a Providence ballpark; and the hiring of a new head for the I-195 Commission.

For more McNamara, check our Bonus Q&A interview with him.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The state Commerce Corporation has agreed to a $12.5 million dollar settlement with four defendants over the collapse of video-game maker 38 Studios, including Keith Stokes, the former head of the state's economic development agency.

  Thank goodness for a new week. Could last week have been any worse for Boston sports?

Thanks for stopping by. The legislative year is almost over -- the traditional part, anyway -- but the political world always keeps spinning. I welcome your tips and thoughts at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and you can follow me through the week on the twitters. Here we go.

Pages