Affordable Care Act

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Rhode Island health officials are busy analyzing the potential impacts of the Republican plan to replace Obamacare. Proposed funding cuts to Medicaid  - the health insurance program for the poor - could mean covering fewer people or reducing payments to health care providers.

Designing skateboards is just one of Luke Franco's gigs. He has just enough time before his next shift to chat at a café in downtown Providence, R.I.

"I work at the YMCA Monday through Friday with kindergartners through fifth graders. It's split shift; seven to nine, two to six daily," he says. "With the rest of my day, I also work at a local pizza place. And in addition to that, I also own and operate a small skateboard company."

But none of his jobs offers health insurance. I ask him if he worries about that.

Congressional Budget Office

A report issued Monday by the Congressional Budget Office ran the numbers on the Republicans' plan to replace the Affordable Care Act, called the American Health Care Act. Among the highlights: 14 million Americans could lose coverage next year if the proposal moves forward, and nearly double that 10 years from now. The plan reduces the nation's deficit, but it does so by cutting Medicaid funding and reducing health care subsidies.

Stacey Mink / Courtesy of Working Families Organization

Dozens of protestors gathered in downtown Providence yesterday to greet U.S. House Speaker Paul Ryan. Ryan, a Republican, was in the heavily Democratic state to meet with supporters and attend private events.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Online health insurance marketplaces like Rhode Island’s HealthSource RI are a key feature of the Affordable Care Act. Nearly 30,000 Rhode Islanders buy health insurance plans through the exchange, and most receive some kind of federal subsidy to help pay for those plans. But Obamacare is under fire, and there’s a lot of uncertainty about these marketplaces. 


Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health in Rhode Island, Feb. 14

VALENTINE’S DAY: Happy Valentine’s Day! Don’t forget to be good to your heart. Stop smoking. Exercise. Eat healthy food. And surround yourself with people you love and who love you.

RIPR FILE

HealthSource RI is wrapping up its open enrollment period amid uncertainty about the future of state-run health care exchanges under President Donald Trump. Signups are down slightly over last year.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment, The Bottom Line.

This week Dave and Mark are joined by former Blue Cross-Blue Shield of RI President and CEO James Purcell.

The three discuss the Trump Administration and the future of the Affordable Care Act. The also talk about Trump cabinet pick Tom Price for Secretary of Health and Human Services, and possible changes in Medicaid.

When to listen:

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

What’s happening in health care in Rhode Island, Feb. 7:

RIPR

State lawmakers plan a hearing Tuesday on the potential impacts of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. Health officials, consumers, and insurers are among those scheduled to testify.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

If the Affordable Care Act is repealed without a replacement, hospitals in Rhode Island could take a hit. 

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Health and Human Services make up a little more than 40 percent of Governor Gina Raimondo’s proposed 2018 budget. There are no huge surprises in this year’s recommendations, but much uncertainty over the fate of federal health care funding.

Megan Hall / RIPR

As Republicans prepare to repeal the Affordable Care Act without a clear replacement, many Rhode Islanders are concerned about their future. Freelancers, artists, and adjunct professors are in a particularly precarious position, because they don’t have access to employer-sponsored health insurance. 

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo has sent a letter to US House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy urging him to reconsider repealing the Affordable Care Act. Raimondo argues the ACA is working in Rhode Island, and that repealing it would undo progress in insuring more Rhode Islanders.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

State health care leaders are keeping a close watch on the future of the Affordable Care Act.

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