alcohol

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A state representative’s account of drinking by lawmakers at the Statehouse is attracting media attention beyond Rhode Island. But it’s not easy to pin down the actual amount of drinking on Smith Hill.

New Sobering Center Under Construction...At Last

Oct 17, 2016
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

A new sobering center opens next month at a homeless shelter in Providence. It’s a place where inebriated people who would typically be brought to the emergency room can safely sober up. It's meant to save money and guide those patients toward recovery.

An Alternative To The ER, Sobering Center Still In Works

Jul 10, 2015
Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Plans to establish a center where people can go to sober up, instead of the emergency room, have languished for lack of state funding. But a renewed effort to launch the program is underway.

RI Lawmakers Move To Ban Not-Yet-Legal Powdered Alcohol

Mar 2, 2015

Rhode Island lawmakers are considering a ban on so-called powdered alcohol. Yes, that’s a thing, and no, it isn’t legal yet in the United States.

A senate committee is scheduled to consider a couple of bills that would ban a substance known as powdered alcohol – a product that isn’t available yet in this country. It’s alcohol in powder form, to which you add water and mix.

Brown University Medical School professor and doctor at Rhode Island hospital is expected in court Wednesday on charges he violated Rhode Island’s social host law. Bruce Becker is accused of allowing alcohol at a birthday party for his 18-year-old son at their home in Barrington.

A place to sober up, instead of ER, for "frequent fliers"

Feb 14, 2013

A proposal is taking shape to divert frequent users of emergency rooms into a substance abuse treatment facility, instead. Rhode Island’s Department of Behavioral Healthcare has pitched a pilot program for Providence that would transport drunk or high people to a sobering center. Staff there could then connect them with more treatment or housing and job services. Dale Klatzker heads The Providence Center, one of the state’s largest community mental health organizations. He says marshaling the resources to address this social problem will be difficult.