anya rader wallack

The head of HealthSourceRI is stepping down to become director of Medicaid. Anya Rader Wallack starts her new job on Monday.

Former Medicaid Director Deidre Gifford announced her resignation in September. Anya Rader Wallack will take her place on November second. That makes her tenure as head of HealthSource RI, the state’s health insurance marketplace just shy of a year.

Aaron Read

Just 5 percent of Rhode Islanders now lack health insurance and the uninsured rate has dropped by more than half since 2012, according to data released today by HealthSourceRI, the state’s Obamacare health exchange.

The rate of Rhode Islanders who lack health insurance has declined from 11 percent in 2012 to 5 percent now.

Anya Rader Wallack, HealthSource director, said the numbers show the Affordable Care Act is working best in states, like Rhode Island, that have expanded Medicaid and run state-based health exchanges, rather than relying on the federal program.


Months into her tenure as head of HealthSource RI, Anya Rader Wallack is still trying to undo a tangle of customer service problems.

U.S. Supreme Court

Today’s Supreme Court ruling on the Affordable Care Act means tax credits are still available for people who buy health insurance on the federal exchange.

Rhode Island set up its own exchange, HealthSource RI. And because of that, the ruling would not have affected the Ocean State either way. Rhode Islanders who qualify for subsidies to help pay for health insurance will continue to receive them.

A Rhode Islander’s lawsuit against the state’s online health insurance marketplace over abortion coverage has been resolved.  An elective abortion is the termination of a pregnancy at the mother’s request. Until earlier this year, every plan offered on HealthSource RI, the state’s online health insurance marketplace, covered such procedures.

A Rhode Island man sued HealthSource RI, saying his religious beliefs prevented him from paying for insurance that might cover an abortion. Now there’s one plan, at the so-called bronze level – that excludes coverage of elective abortions.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line. 

This week Dave and Mark sit down with Anya Rader Wallack, the new executive director of HealthSource RI.  

Wallack stepped in as director of the exchange this year following Christine Ferguson, who helped create the exchange in 2013. Wallack was installed by Governor Gina Raimondo. She talks about successes, failures, and the future of the exchange.

When to Listen:

HealthSource RI is out with its most recent enrollment data.

It looks like the state's online health insurance marketplace kept two-thirds (71%) of enrollees from last year and gained a quarter more (about 5,000 new enrollees). So with total enrollments for 2015 at 22,910, HealthSource RI didn't lose a bunch of customers but didn't gain a whole lot either.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo has replaced Christine Ferguson as the head of HealthSourceRI, replacing her with Anya Rader Wallack. RIPR reported December 23 how Raimondo was expected to make this change.

Raimondo did not explain the reason for the change in a statement. Outgoing Governor Lincoln Chafee created HealthSource, Rhode Island's version of Obamacare by executive order, and legislative leaders have not been huge fans of the program.

Governor-elect Gina Raimondo is expected to replace Christine Ferguson as the leader of HealthSourceRI, Rhode Island's version of Obamacare, RIPR has learned.

The leading candidate to replace Ferguson is Anya Rader Wallack, the president of Arrowhead Health Analytics in Fall River, Massachusetts, and a former policy director and deputy chief of staff for former Vermont governor Howard Dean. Rader Wallack declined comment when contacted by RIPR.

Anya Rader Wallack, who as chairwoman of the Green Mountain Health Care Board has led Vermont Gov. Peter Shumlin’s ambitious state health care overhaul, is leaving the post and moving back to Rhode Island.

Rader Wallack, one of New England’s leading health policy gurus, is leaving Vermont because her family, which is based in Little Compton, does not want to move to the Green Mountain state, she said.