attorney general

Providence Man Convicted Of Murder For Selling Fentanyl

Apr 12, 2017
Steven Depolo / flickr

A Providence man has been convicted of second degree murder for selling the potent opioid fentanyl to someone who later died of an overdose. The state’s Attorney General believes this is Rhode Island’s first conviction of its type.

John Bender / RIPR

Former Providence State Rep. John Carnevale pleaded not guilty in Superior Court Friday to charges of perjury and filing false documents. The charges stem from an investigation into Carnevale’s residency.

The attorney general’s office alleges Carnevale lied under oath to the Providence Board of Canvassers during hearings to determine his residency. The former lawmaker owned two residences, one in Johnston and another in Providence. He maintained his primary residence was in Providence. The board eventually determined Carnevale was not eligible to represent his district.

John Bender / RIPR

Former state Representative John Carnevale is the custody of State Police, according to WPRI-TV, Channel 12. The station says Carnevale turned himself in to State Police headquarters in Scituate on Thursday, where he will be held through the night. Carnevale is scheduled to be arraigned in Superior Court Friday morning.

The charges Carnevale faces remain unclear. State police could not be reached, and Amy Kempe, spokeswoman for the attorney general, offered no comment.

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

There have been anecdotal reports about a rise in hate crimes around the country since the presidential election. But it remains unclear whether there’s been a similar uptick in Rhode Island. That's because the state has no centralized mechanism for reporting suspected hate crimes.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin's office says the only way to find out would be to survey local police departments.

RIPR file photo

Attorneys General from across the eastern United States convene Thursday in Newport. They’re participating in a two-day conference organized by the National Association of Attorneys General.

Amy Kempe from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office says the meeting will focus on making the most of taxpayer money through partnerships.

RIPR FILE

The American Civil Liberties Union of Rhode Island is opposing a move to increase ethics oversight at the state legislature. A ballot measure would restore some powers to the state Ethics Commission.

The Ethics Commission is a body tasked with investigating complaints of corruption, abuse of power, or potential conflicts of interest in state and municipal government.

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin

Rhode Island’s Attorney General has issued guidance for law enforcement after the expiration of the Good Samaritan law. The law was created to protect people from drug charges if they call 911 about a drug overdose; it expired July 1st after lawmakers took no action to extend it before adjourning for the summer.

Bernard Gagnon / Wikimedia Commons

As the Patriots hurtle towards the American Football Conference championships this weekend, the Attorney General’s office is warning fans not to fall for ticket scams. 

For high profile games like the AFC Championships or the Super bowl demand for tickets goes up, and with it, the opportunity for scams.  The AG’s office reminds local fans not to let themselves be tricked just to get a real-life glimpse of the grid-iron.  If you missed out on regular tickets don’t go to sites like Craigslist to find one.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

A local government watchdog group thinks stiffer penalties are needed to discourage the practice of unregulated lobbying.   

The Associated Press reported this week that former Attorney General Patrick Lynch has lobbied his former office several times without registering as a lobbyist. Lynch told the AP his actions didn’t amount to lobbying.

Catherine Welch / RIPR

Republican State Senator Dawson Hodgson is challenging incumbent Attorney general Peter Kilmartin. As part of our election coverage, Rhody Votes ’14, Rhode Island Public Radio’s Catherine Welch  sat down with Hodgson to talk about open records, strengthening gun laws and legalizing marijuana.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic? Please email us, we'd like to hear from you. news@ripr.org

RIPR

Attorney General Peter Kilmartin hosts fellow AG’s from across the Northeast for a two-day conference addressing sexual assault on college campuses. The group will work to determine how law enforcement can do a better job investigating campus sexual assault.

Police departments from across Rhode Island are reporting on the impact of the state’s relatively new Good Samaritan Law. The law shields from prosecution anyone seeking medical assistance for someone who’s experiencing a drug overdose, with exceptions for crimes involving manufacturing and distributing drugs.

The Good Samaritan law – also known as Good Sam - took effect in June 2012. And the idea was to encourage more people to call 911 for a friend who’s overdosing. Before the law, the caller could be arrested on drug possession or other charges.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

State Senator Dawson Hodgson of North Kingstown Tuesday launched his Republican challenge to Democratic Attorney General Peter Kilmartin.  Hodgson says the theme of his campaign will be one of standing up for Rhode Island.

Hodgson is a former state prosecutor serving his second term in the Senate. He’s best known for calling for the creation of an independent commission to investigate failed video game company 38 Studios. Hodgson said he’s consistently been an advocate for the people of the state.

It’s been almost two years since five Rhode Island law enforcement agencies received a financial windfall from the Google settlement. Google was forced to pay a $500 million fine for illegally selling drugs to Americans without a prescription.  About half of the money was returned to the Rhode Island law enforcement agencies that investigated and tried the case.  How the three largest recipients are spending the money.

Exeter Town Councilors Hold On To Their Seats

Dec 16, 2013
Wikimedia Commons

Four Exeter town councilors have easily survived a recall election spawned by critics of a plan to transfer control of concealed weapons permits from the town  to the state.  Unlike most towns, Exeter is so small it has no police department and councilors felt the town  clerk didn’t have the resources needed to do the job properly. The results of the election plus reaction from both sides.

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