Audubon Society of Rhode Island

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Nature enthusiasts around the state are monitoring butterflies for an annual survey taking place across North America. Many factors, including climate change and pesticides, are affecting butterflies,  hindering their ability to successfully breed and develop.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Four peregrine falcons hatched earlier this spring on top of the Superman Building in downtown Providence. Volunteers have now banded the birds so that biologists can keep track of them. 

Screenshot of the Audubon Society of Rhode Island's Peregrine Falcon Webcam

The iconic Superman Building may be vacant, but it has no trouble attracting peregrine falcons. The skyscraper’s current residents welcomed four chicks this week.

Environmentalists Gather For Annual Meeting

Mar 19, 2016
Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Wildlife, climate change and safe drinking water are on the agenda this weekend at the state’s largest annual environmental summit.

Meg Kerr, the director of policy at the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, is one of the organizers of the Land and Water Conservation Summit. The summit is expected to draw more than 300 people representing land trusts, watershed organizations and conservation commissions.

RI Osprey Population Continues To Flourish

Mar 2, 2016
Ed Hughes /Audubon Society of Rhode Island

As spring weather returns to the Rhode Island area, so will the growing population of osprey, a type of coastal bird. The Audubon Society of Rhode Island reports the number of osprey spotted nesting in Rhode Island has risen sharply over the last couple of years. The population has been monitored since the 1970s, when the fish-eating birds nearly disappeared from Rhode Island’s coastline.

Jonathan Scoones at the Audubon Society called the recovery of the osprey population an environmental success story.   

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

One of the most respected environmental leaders in the state is retiring. For more than 30 years, Eugenia Marks was never shy about sharing her views with political leaders about the need to protect the environment. She's the senior policy director at the Audubon Society of Rhode Island, and she's about to step down.

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

Photographer Peter Green enjoys bird watching around Rhode Island. But his favorite spot is downtown Providence.  Most people are too busy to notice birds of prey circling this urban setting. But Green has become something of an expert.

Photo Courtesy of Peter Green

In Bristol this weekend, live owls, hawks, and other birds of prey will take center stage at the Audubon Society’s Environmental Education Center. The annual event Raptor Weekend will also feature photographs by a local bird photographer.

Courtesy of Peter Green / Audubon Society of Rhode Island

On Thursday morning three peregrine falcon chicks were banded atop the Bank of America building in downtown Providence.

Jeff Hall, senior director of advancement at the Audubon Society of Rhode Island (ASRI), was there to assist. He said falcons have been nesting at the Superman Building for 15 years now, making this a yearly spring ritual.

Ed Hughes / Audubon Society of Rhode Island

The Audubon Society of Rhode Island is leading free daily birds walks this month, during the height of spring migration, all over the state from North Smithfield to Coventry to South Kingstown.

At this time of year, male birds are sporting bright colored plumage to attract mates. Jeffrey Hall, the organization’s senior director of advancement, points out that trees aren’t lush with leaves yet. 

Ambar Espinoza / RIPR

The female falcon that nested atop the Superman building last year is back this spring. The falcon laid her first egg less than a week ago, according to Jeff Hall, senior director of advancement for the Audubon Society of Rhode Island.

Through the organization’s Peregrine webcam, bird enthusiasts are observing the falcon and her male partner taking turns at the nest. Hall said the falcon will sit on her eggs constantly until all her eggs are laid.

“So all the eggs will then mature, if you would, at the same time,” said Hall. “so they’ll all hatch around the same time.”

Ed Hughes / Courtesy of Audubon Society of Rhode Island

Bald eagles aren’t the only bird of prey thriving in Rhode Island. Ospreys are also making a comeback.

The population of ospreys substantially declined from the use of the pesticide DDT after World War II. Rhode Island initiated an osprey monitoring program in 1977 to document the fish-eating raptor’s recovery and breeding success.

Heidi Piccerelli / Courtesy of Audubon Society of Rhode Island

Birders are spotting bald eagles in Rhode Island in greater numbers than ever before. As Rhode Island Public Radio’s environmental reporter Ambar Espinoza reports, this is a sign the bird of prey is rebounding in much of its former geographic range, which includes New England.

Peregrine Juvenile Falcons Recover From Hunting Crashes

Jul 2, 2014
Courtesy of Peter Green via Audubon Society of Rhode Island

Over the weekend, two of the falcons born atop the Superman building in May crashed into a building downtown while they were swooping, or practicing hunting. 

The Born to Be Wild Nature Center is rehabilitating the falcon that survived the crash.

Jeff Hall from the Audubon Society of Rhode Island is hopeful the injured juvenile falcon will make a full recovery. 

Photo Courtesy of Peter Green via Audubon Society of Rhode Island

Three baby peregrine falcons born atop Providence’s Superman building are now banded for tracking.

  There were four eggs, but only three chicks survived, all boys. And now they have bands on their legs that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will keep a record of.

The Audubon Society of Rhode Island’s Jeff Hall said the banding took about a half hour, and the process started when licensed bander Joe Zbyrowski climbed a ladder to reach the chicks nesting in a special box.

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