John Bender / RIPR

The new PawSox leadership group is no longer ruling out McCoy Stadium as the permanent home of the triple-a baseball team. However, the group offered scant details on any new stadium deal during a media introduction to their new leaders in the club house at McCoy Stadium Monday.

PawSox chairman Larry Lucchino declined to discuss plans to either keep the team in Pawtucket or move to a new city.  He focused instead on introductions for new PawSox President, Dr. Charles Steinberg. He steps in following the unexpected death of former President Jim Skeffington.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Pawtucket Mayor Donald R. Grebien wants Governor Gina Raimondo to commission a feasibility study examining the cost of modernizing McCoy Stadium, so the figure can be weighed against the Providence stadium concept backed by the ownership of the Pawtucket Red Sox.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

Larry Lucchino's role in seeking a new Providence ballpark for the Pawtucket Red Sox "remains unchanged," a team spokeswoman said Saturday, even though Lucchino is winding down his impactful role as CEO of the Boston Red Sox.

"Larry's role remains unchanged with respect to the PawSox ownership group," Patti Doyle said via e-mail. "He remains focused on achieving a renegotiated agreement with the state on relocating the team to a new ballpark on lands within the I-195 District [area] in Providence."

The PawSox new ownership team kicks off a listening tour, to drum up support and answer residents’ questions about a proposed new stadium.  The group plans to stop in all of Rhode Island’s 39 cities and towns. The first stop is at the Smithfield Senior Center in Greenville at 5 in the evening.

Opponents of building a new Pawsox stadium in Providence are rallying Thursday at the Statehouse. They want the team to stay in Pawtucket.

Organizing for Pawtucket Founder David Norton organized the rally.

“We want to make it crystal clear to our elected leaders that a very strong majority of Rhode Islanders oppose building a new stadium in Providence,” said Norton. “They’re in opposition to it.”

Some Providence residents have also openly opposed the idea. Norton says moving the team to Providence would be bad for business.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

Governor Gina Raimondo said Tuesday she's unsure if the Pawtucket Red Sox proposal to move to Providence will be decided -- as the team's ownership hopes -- before the end of the General Assembly session.

Ian Donnis

Dozens of protesters gathered Monday afternoon outside a meeting of the PawSox' owners and the Interstate-195 Redevelopment Commission.

The team is making its pitch for a stadium in downtown Providence with financial assistance from the state.

Gary Whitney, a North Kingstown resident who participated in the protest, said he doesn't believe any public money should be used for the project.

Two co-owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox are slated to make a pitch on their Providence stadium proposal to the 195 Redevelopment Commission Monday. Boston Red Sox president and CEO Larry Lucchino will be one of those speaking to the commission. The move comes as the team has indicated some flexibility in its proposal for a Providence ballpark, including possibly buying the land for it.

After two snow-packed months, the apparent settling of the pension conflict, and Lincoln Chafee's surprising emergence as a possible presidential hopeful, Rhode Island confronts a sharp debate involving baseball, public dollars, and the future of the state. No pressure, right? Thanks, as always, for stopping by for my weekly column. Feel free to drop me a line at idonnis (at) ripr (dot) org, and to follow me on the twitters. Here we go.

The debate over the Pawtucket Red Sox and a public subsidy to help keep the team in Rhode Island began in earnest Wednesday as PawSox ownership unveiled their much-anticipated plan for a $70 million ballpark next to the Providence River. According to the proposal, a 30-year lease/sublease agreement would have a net cost to the state of about $2 million a year.

PawSox ownership said its proposal does not include issuing any bonds or public debt, and that the team will pay for the full cost of the design and construction of its envisioned 10,000 seat ballpark.

John Bender / RIPR

The owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox plan to unveil Wednesday afternoon their proposal for building a new ballpark in Providence. Some observers are excited about the move to bring professional baseball to Rhode Island’s capital city. Yet others are wary about using public dollars for a private enterprise. There’s also debate about using part of a site targeted for high-wage jobs.


The Boston Red Sox beat the Washington Nationals 4-9 on Monday in their home opener at Fenway.


Before the game, Tiverton resident Lorne Solway, saide he planned to watch from home, with special attention paid to new pitcher Rick Porcello.

“I’d like to see the pitcher do well," Solway said.  "He’s new to the Red Sox and I think he’s going to help the team a lot.”

In Providence, Boston native Emily Cuddy said she’s pumped about the new season.

John Bender / RIPR

The new owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox hosted a walking tour Thursday of the proposed site for a new stadium in Providence. The owners want to move the team from Pawtucket, but there are questions about their plan.

The new owners group wants to build a 10-thousand seat baseball stadium, on a piece of former highway land near downtown Providence. Some of that land was set aside for a public park.  But the owners say it’s ideal for a stadium because of its central location, close to amenities and public transit.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The new ownership of the Pawtucket Red Sox is expected to unveil a formal proposal next month for a new ballpark in Providence. James Skeffington is the president of the new ownership group. The 72-year-old lawyer and longtime Providence power broker says moving the PawSox to a parcel of former highway land would complement efforts to develop the area.

Do you have insight or expertise on this topic?  Please email us, we'd like to hear from you.

Don Borman

The Providence City Council is putting together an advisory commission to study the impact of moving the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket to a new stadium in downtown Providence,  Council President Luis Aponte told Rhode Island Public Radio.

Aponte said the commission would be charged with examining the proposal advanced by the new owners of the top Boston Red Sox farm club, who announced last week their intent to shift the team from historic McCoy to a new ballpark to be built on open land along the downtown waterfront that was cleared when Route 195 was razed.