Board of Education

Ian Donnis

A legislative committee on Wednesday approved four nominees for a combined board overseeing K-through-12 and higher education. But critics still question whether the merged education board is a good idea.

A stream of witnesses touted the commitment to public education of the four nominees. The Senate Education Committee approved each of them by at least 8 of 10 votes.

The Senate Education Committee holds hearings today on nominees for a new State Board of Education. The picks from Governor Lincoln Chafee include teachers' union president Larry Purtill and Colleen Callahan, also a teachers’ union leader, and a member of the former Board of Regents for Elementary and Secondary Education.

State lawmakers dissolved the Board of Regents along with the board overseeing colleges and universities to create a new combined board of education. The move was aimed at improving coordination between higher education and K-12 schools.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) Governor Lincoln Chafee has announced his nominees for a new Board of Education, replacing the boards of higher education and K-12 public schools. The nine nominations include two teachers union officials, an emergency room physician and several attorneys.

Most are former members of the recently dissolved board of elementary and secondary schools and the board that oversaw higher education.

Just before Christmas, Chafee announced his selection of attorney Eva Marie Mancuso to chair the Board of Education.

Governor Lincoln Chafee has announced his picks for the new 11-member board of education, which replaces two former boards overseeing K-12 schools and colleges and universities.

The selections are mostly alums of the two boards that lawmakers dissolved in a June vote. As of December, Chafee had named only his choice to chair the board, leaving Rhode Island with no board in charge of education on January 1st.

Here are bios for the education board picks from a statehouse communiqué:

Rhode Island Public Radio's Political Analyst Scott MacKay answers my questions about the political machinations that left Rhode Island with no board for either K-12 public schools or colleges and universities at the start of 2013.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) RIPR Political Commentator Scott MacKay analyzes why the state does not have a functioning Board of Education.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) State senator Hanna Gallo says she expects her bill to push back the effective date on a new board that would govern K-12 and higher education will be approved Thursday. The board has technically been in effect since Tuesday.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) The state Senate approved a bill Thursday to allow additional time for a controversial merger of two state boards of education.

The bill will continue the existence until March 7 of separate state boards for K-through-12 and public higher education. It also pushes back until September the final structure for combining the two boards.

(PROVIDENCE, RI) The state senate is expected to vote Thursday on legislation that pushes back the starting date of a new board overseeing both K-12 and higher education.

In the final days of the last session, lawmakers approved legislation squeezed into the state budget that merges the boards governing K-12 and higher education. The new board has been technically in effect since Tuesday, but there are no members in place to govern.

A bill introduced Wednesday by state Senator Hanna Gallo would delay until September 1 the “final plan for the permanent administrative structure” for the controversial combined state Board of Education.

In a signal of a green light for the bill, cosponsors include Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed and Majority Leader Dominick Ruggerio.

George Caruolo has asked Governor Lincoln Chafee to withdraw his name from consideration as the nominee to chair a controversial new combined state Board of Education.

Via statement:

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