Board of Elections

RIPR FILE

Secretary of State Nellie Gorbea has unveiled legislation aimed at reforming Rhode Island’s voting laws. Gorbea promised to modernize the voting system during her campaign.

The proposed legislation brings online voter registration to Rhode Island. Residents would enter a database that can be updated when people move out of town or out of state. Gorbea said that would reduce redundancies in the voter rolls.

Candidates who’ve run for office owe a total of more than $2 million in fines to the state Board of Elections for past-due campaign reports. The board collected about $43,000 in fines last year.

Former South Kingstown State Senator Patrick McDonald owes the most – nearly $214,000 -- in the Board of Election’s newly posted list of outstanding fines. The outlook for collecting that money is considered bleak as McDonald is currently serving prison time for embezzlement.

A councilor who hopes to be the next president of the Providence City Council says he will pay off nearly 50-thousand dollars in fines owed to the state Board of Elections.

Ward 10 Councilman Luis Aponte has represented Washington Park and parts of South Providence since first winning election in 1998. During that time, Aponte has racked up nearly 50-thousand dollars in Board of Election fines for not filing campaign fundraising reports. Aponte said it’s time for him to deal with the issue.

The Rhode Island Republican Party has taken its complaint over a campaign commercial for gubernatorial candidate Gina Raimondo to the state Board of Elections.  Democrats insist they’re not doing anything wrong.

Rhode Island Artscape: Designing Better Ballots

Feb 27, 2014
John Bender / RIPR

In Rhode Island a group of design students barely old enough to vote are working on projects that could potentially affect the future of Presidential elections.

For this month’s Artscape, Rhode Island Public Radio’s John Bender profiles a class that is trying to tackle the problem of a better ballot.

On the third floor of a building in downtown Providence, a group of a dozen or so students from the Rhode Island School of Design, also known as RISD are giving their final presentations for a class called VoteLab: Designing for Democracy.

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