boston red sox

Don Borman / RIPR File

  Baseball is back in New England. The Boston Red Sox open their home season this afternoon at Fenway Park and the team hopes to rebound after a last-place finish. Their top minor league club, the Pawtucket Red Sox, face some different challenges this season, says RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay.

Bill Wanless / PawSox

Signs of spring are hard to find in Rhode Island. But Red Sox fans caught a glimpse of baseball season Wednesday.

The Red Sox spring training truck made a stop in Pawtucket before hitting the road to Ft. Meyers Florida. So-called “Truck Day” has become a tradition at Fenway, but this is the first time the truck has also stopped at McCoy Stadium, home to the Red Sox AAA team, the Pawtucket Red Sox.

PawSox spokesperson Bill Wanless called it a unique opportunity for local baseball fans.

Deflated footballs proved more newsworthy than a Super Bowl trophy, NCAA hockey championship hardware and the bill of sale for a beloved minor-league baseball franchise this year. Eleven months after the New England Patriots used underinflated footballs in the first half of the AFC Championship game against the Indianapolis Colts, Deflategate drags on. That’s why it is without question THE sports story of 2015 in Rhode Island and the rest of New England.

One day after learning his non-Hodgkins lymphoma is in remission, Red Sox Manager John Farrell says he is feeling grateful.

During a Friday afternoon conference call with reporters, Farrell said he's recovering after treatment.

"Basically there was six months of chemo given in an eight week period," Farrell said. "That was to combat the aggressive nature of the cancer."

Farrell described the treatment regimen as "pretty intense."

"It beat me up physically, but honestly right now, feeling pretty darn good."

Do you remember Oct. 21, 1975? Game 6 of the World Series? Reds versus Red Sox? Carlton Fisk’s 12th-inning home run that ended what many baseball observers still consider the most exciting game in World Series history?

It was 40 years ago tonight – and tomorrow morning – yet for those who were there or watched on television or listened on radio, it was yesterday.

John Bender

Former Gov. Lincoln Chafee, now seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, weighed in this afternoon on the release of the 38 Studios court documents.

It was Chafee, a vigorous opponent of the 38 Studios deal when he was running for governor in 2010, who later hired lawyer Max Wistow to file suit against principals in the deal. 38 Studios went bankrupt, leaving taxpayers holding the bag for $75 million in state-backed bonds to the company run by former Boston Red Sox star pitcher Curt Schilling.

The plan for a new stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox in Providence has hit a roadblock. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay parses how this field of dreams turned into a nightmare.

  Thank goodness for a new week. Could last week have been any worse for Boston sports?

Another day in Providence, another desultory meeting on the plan to move the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium to a new ballpark to be built on the capital city’s downtown waterfront.

Today’s meeting featured Pat O’Conner, president and CEO of Minor League Baseball, who spoke about the finances of minor league stadiums around the nation at a meeting with reporters, labor leaders and a small group of state lawmakers at the offices of the Locke Lord LLC law firm.

One of the principals of the new Pawtucket Red Sox ownership has died abruptly and was laid to rest over the weekend.. RIPR Political Analyst Scott MacKay assays the future of the Providence stadium plan.

Jim Skeffington cut quite a figure in Rhode Island. The Providence native scaled the heights of the legal profession in his hometown and was the go-to-guy for political and business deals. His bespoke bankers’ pinstripes and Ferragamo ties masked a sharp understanding, from the bottom up, of Rhode Island’s florid political and business cultures.

The sweat box that is the Rhode Island Statehouse in the summer months may become a thing of the past.

So Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza wants to build a trolley system. RIPR Political analyst Scott MacKay says this is a great idea, but can the city afford it?

Sure, it would  be wonderful to jump on a Providence  trolley system and ride from Brown University, down historic College Hill, to Rhode Island Hospital..

One can even imagine taking the trolley to a spanking new retro baseball stadium along the Providence River to watch the Boston Red Sox top minor league team.

Providence’s rich baseball history is on display at City Hall in a new exhibit to be formally unveiled tomorrow (May 7) at City Hall.

The exhibit, which features memorabilia, baseball cards and photographs of the city’s long and florid baseball history, is located on the third floor of City Hall.

A reception introducing the exhibit will be held at 6  p.m. tomorrow on the third floor at City Hall. It will be hosted by City Council President Luis Aponte, a Ward 10 Democrat, and City Archivist Paul Campbell, a noted Rhode Island historian.

  Say what you will about Alex Rodriguez, the man has a flair for the dramatic.

Friday night at Fenway Park, pinch hitting in the eighth inning of a 2-2 game, Rodriguez lined a 3-0 pitch from Junichi Tazawa into the Green Monster sea,ts, giving the New York Yankees the lead and eventually a 3-2 victory over the Boston Red Sox.

The owner of the Victory Place parcel near Davol Square, JAG Investment Realty, on Tuesday suggested the site as an alternative location for creating a stadium for the Pawtucket Red Sox.

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