boston red sox

John Bender / RIPR

The owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox plan to unveil Wednesday afternoon their proposal for building a new ballpark in Providence. Some observers are excited about the move to bring professional baseball to Rhode Island’s capital city. Yet others are wary about using public dollars for a private enterprise. There’s also debate about using part of a site targeted for high-wage jobs.

Ian Donnis / RIPR

The new ownership of the Pawtucket Red Sox is expected to unveil a formal proposal next month for a new ballpark in Providence. James Skeffington is the president of the new ownership group. The 72-year-old lawyer and longtime Providence power broker says moving the PawSox to a parcel of former highway land would complement efforts to develop the area.

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The debate over moving the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium to a new ball park in Providence is raging. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it’s time for serious study, not hyperbole.

Tis the season of renewal: Easter, Passover and daffodils. Along with the longer days comes the return of baseball to New England. It may be hard to believe after our  harsh winter, but in two weeks the season opens at Fenway Park in Boston and at McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket.

Don Borman

  If the state gives financial incentives to Providence to move the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium to a new stadium to be built on the Providence waterfront, Pawtucket plans to seek state money to raze and redevelop McCoy.

That’s the word from Tony Pires, administration director for Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien, after a meeting today with members of the Pawtucket City Council and the General Assembly’s Pawtucket delegation.

A report from Worcester brings this unsurprising news: Members of the Worcester City Council want to study whether the city can lure the Pawtucket Red Sox to the central Massachusetts city.

Two city council members in Worcester have requested that the city work with the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce and other groups to try to get the PawSox to move to Worcester. The plan is scheduled to be debated at a council meeting tomorrow evening, according to a report from

Don Borman

The Providence City Council is putting together an advisory commission to study the impact of moving the Pawtucket Red Sox from McCoy Stadium in Pawtucket to a new stadium in downtown Providence,  Council President Luis Aponte told Rhode Island Public Radio.

Aponte said the commission would be charged with examining the proposal advanced by the new owners of the top Boston Red Sox farm club, who announced last week their intent to shift the team from historic McCoy to a new ballpark to be built on open land along the downtown waterfront that was cleared when Route 195 was razed.

John Bender / RIPR File

So is Rhode Island approaching a boon or a boondoggle?

Don’t get in line just yet for your luxury box seats at the new Providence ballpark that the new owners of the Pawtucket Red Sox want to build on the downtown Providence waterfront . The new owners and Mayor Jorge Elorza say any plan for a new  stadium is in infant stages.

While the move from Pawtucket’s iconic McCoy Stadium to a new site in Providence has drawn stellar initial reviews from the state’s political hierarchy and Elorza, the plans are a long, long fly ball from completion.


The Pawtucket Red Sox have been sold to a group of familiar Rhode Island business leaders and Boston Red Sox executives who are intent on moving the team from McCoy Stadium to a new ballpark that would be built in downtown Providence.

Pawtucket Mayor Donald Grebien was briefed last night by one of the new owners, Providence lawyer James Skeffington, said Antonio Pires, Pawtucket administration director. Skeffington told the Pawtucket mayor that the new group wants to move to a privately-financed stadium on the Providence downtown waterfront.

File/Aaron Read / RIPR

Rhode Islanders have been transfixed lately by snow drifts and the Super Bowl. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says it’s time to look ahead to spring and the return of baseball.

Has dealing with that white mountain in your driveway reminded you that one never has to shovel humidity? Do you yearn for a sport where the balls can be scuffed, but not deflated?


Once again the Pawtucket Red Sox are under threat of leaving the state. The team is up for sale, its former owner Ben Mondor died four years ago. His widow Madeleine is looking to sell the minor league affiliate of the Boston Red Sox. Joining me to parse out what we know and what we don’t know about the team’s fate, is Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay.

With less than a week to go before we welcome 2015, it’s time to reflect upon the stories that informed, entertained and intrigued us most during 2014. These are the sports stories that grabbed my attention.


Rhode Island’s Democratic General Assembly leaders want to exempt pensions and social security from state income taxes. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders if this makes sense in our cash-strapped state government.

House Speaker Nick Mattiello, D-Cranston and Senate President Teresa Paiva Weed, D-Newport, have both said that one of their top priorities when the Assembly convenes in January is legislation that would end income taxes on pensions and social security.

Rhode Islanders of a certain age well remember the `Hi Neighbor, Have a `Gansett’ television advertising campaign  that pushed Narragansett Beer, which in days of yore was brewed in Cranston. Now Gina Raimondo is using an old timey Narragansett commercial to tout her campaign for governor.

Rhode Island  Superior Court Judge Michael Silverstein has upheld an initial legal settlement in Gov. Lincoln Chafee’s 38 Studios lawsuit over the $75 million state loan guarantee granted to the failed video game company started by Curt Schilling, the former  Boston Red Sox pitcher.

In an opinion released this afternoon, Silverstein approved a $4.4 million settlement reached with the Providence law firm of Moses, Alfonso and Ryan, a firm that advised the state on bonds of the ill-fated loan program.

Hockey fans of the Boston Bruins will be able to show their allegiance on their Rhode Island license plates under legislation approved by the General Assembly and signed into law by Gov. Lincoln Chafee.

Under the law, the new Bruins plates will cost hockey devotees an extra $40, half of which will go to the state and half will be allocated to charities affiliated with the Boston Bruins Foundation. The money must be spent on Rhode Island-based charities.