Brown University


Brown University has adopted a new single policy on sexual assault. The policy was recommended by a task force last year.

That task force was formed after a student alleged that she was sexually assaulted at a Brown fraternity party, in 2014. The new policy streamlines the complaint process for people reporting alleged instances of sexual assault.

One notable change is the use of trained investigators when examining these claims. The investigators are expected to interview students, witnesses, and responders when preparing reports to resolve complaints.

Ian Donnis/File Photo / RIPR

The potential cost of buying Brown University-owned land for a PawSox stadium is raising questions about the feasibility of the project, a team spokeswoman said Thursday.

PawSox spokeswoman Patti Doyle said the team still hopes to reach a renegotiated agreement to build a 10,000-seat ballpark on part of the former I-195 land in Providence.

But Doyle acknowledged that the cost of buying the part of the land owned by Brown -- expected to top $10 million -- is leading to questions of "Is this still workable? Is this something we can come to terms with?"

Elisabeth Harrison / RIPR

Students head to classrooms this week in the annual back-to-school ritual. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay says this should be the year our public schools embrace teaching history and civics.

Kristin Gourlay / RIPR

Art and medicine have long been intertwined - from the earliest depictions of human anatomy to modern art therapy. A new art exhibit (“Interstice: Memory, Mind, and Alzheimer's Disease," open through September 9 in the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts at Brown University) takes that relationship in a new direction. A neuroscientist and artist teamed up with fellow artists to explore what it’s like to have Alzheimer’s Disease. 

Researchers are warning residents to drink plenty of water and keep to the shade on hot summer days like today. A study from Brown University and the Rhode Island Department of Health finds that hot temperatures affect people of all ages, not just children and seniors.

Providence Business News Editor Mark Murphy joins Rhode Island Public Radio's Dave Fallon for our weekly business segment The Bottom Line.

This week Mark and Dave speak with Kelly Ramirez, the CEO of the Social Enterprise Greenhouse, a local business-incubator, for socially minded businesses. The group just won a national competition for their work with start-ups. Since its inception five years ago, the group has worked with 65 business. SE Greenhouse recently partnered with Brown University.


When to listen:

Ian Donnis

Cranston Mayor Allan Fung’s response to a police controversy could damage his political prospects, according to Brown University political science professor Wendy Schiller. Schiller said it will take time for the fallout to settle from a state police report, which alleges the mayor interfered in the Cranston Police Department.

Mayor Fung has declined, at least for now, to release the report, pointing to confidentiality issues. Schiller said that could be a mistake.

Steven Depolo / Creative Commons license

Exposure to a trio of common chemicals can affect developing babies’ brains. But it’s unclear what role those chemicals play as kids get older. One Brown University researcher aims to find out.

Aaron Read / RIPR

A coalition of researchers from Rhode Island’s colleges and universities have released another round of reports on the state’s economy. RIPR political analyst Scott MacKay wonders what will happen to the latest round of research.

If Rhode Island were a bench, it would splinter under the weight of all the blue-ribbon commissions and consultant-generated reports that have for decades weighed in on what ails our state’s economy.

Mike Cohea / Photo Courtesy of Brown University

A Brown University professor has joined a team of scientists from four European countries to study how plant reproduction has evolved. This research could ultimately help improve crop yields in light of climate change and a rapidly growing population.

Audio Pending...

Congrats to Emma Dickson of Providence and Brown University, who has been named a White House summer intern, according to a White House statement. Dickson is a former intern at Rhode Island Public Radio and also served as an intern at former Gov. Lincoln Chafee’s press office.

Other Brown students named to the prestigious program are Sydney Menzin of Locust Valley, N.Y., and Benjamin Miller-Gootnick of Washington, D.C.

Chris Hondros / Getty Images

The shooting death of nine people at Emanuel AME church in Charleston, South Carolina, has raised a nationwide discussion about the Confederate battle flag. The flag is prominently displayed in many parts of the American South, including the South Carolina Statehouse. Many people are calling for its removal, but some say its cultural touchstone, that should remain.

Rhode Island Public Radio’s Scott MacKay got some insight from Brown Professor Matthew Guterl who specializes in race after the civil war.

A quiet Warwick neighborhood has been rocked in recent days following the arrest of one of its residents on terrorism charges. Federal authorities picked up 24-year-old Nicholas Rovinski on charges of aiding this Islamic State. He’s also charged with conspiring to commit acts of violence against U.S. citizens.

According to an affidavit Rovinski had an active online presence; communicating in support of the Islamic State, or ISIS.

RIPR file photo

Brown University ranks among the top 10 universities whose undergraduates go on to win the prestigious MacArthur "genius" grant, according to new data from the MacArthur Foundation.

Since the foundation began awarding the grants, which honor individuals with great creative potential, Brown graduates have received 14 awards. Harvard produces the most recipients by far with 72 grantees.

Brown University researchers have found that the increasing use of hospice care at the end of life has increased health care spending. That’s contrary to what experts expected.

Hospice is for patients with a terminal illness who are ready to forgo more aggressive treatments. It’s supposed to be less expensive. But Brown University researcher Pedro Gozalo says the numbers tell a different story. He found more people entering hospice, staying longer, and driving up costs. Gozalo said he supports the use of hospice care.