Brown University

We’re checking in on our Future Docs Sarah and Peter, whom we’re following all year to learn more about becoming a doctor in today’s changing health care landscape. They’re half way through their second year of medical school now, and they’re already grappling with career decisions and the realities of a hospital’s sickest patients.

Photo by: Kristin Gourlay

Sarah Rapoport is a second year student at Brown University's medical school. She's 24, a New Yorker, and already an accomplished scientist. When we last checked in with her, she was waiting for her cardiology exam results and had just started doing shifts in an emergency department. She did great. Now, she's thinking about her future.

"It's constantly a conversation in the back of my head," she says.

Brown University

Ed Wing, Dean of Medicine and Biology at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, will be stepping down at the end of this academic year. He’ll return to Brown after a sabbatical to continue teaching, researching, and writing. Meanwhile, the university will launch a national search for his replacement.

UPDATE:The first lecture in this series has been rescheduled for Thursday, Nov. 1 at 5 pm.

The Rhode Island Medical Society is marking its 200th anniversary with a series of neuroscience-related lectures, all free and open to the public. The lectures are co-sponsored by Brown’s Institute for Brain Science and the Norman Prince Neurosciences Institute.

Photo by Brown University

There's more on our future docs series, including a brief history of medical education in the

Dr. Phil Gruppuso started out as a pediatrician. He says that when he entered med school in the 1970s, his path looked really clear.

"It was pretty simple for me. I was able to complete medical school knowing that I would become a licensed physician and would practice medicine in a system that was not very different than the one I'd grown up in. And that was really true until about five to 10 years ago."

Medical school isn’t what it used to be. Budding doctors have to learn more and study harder than they ever have. And changes in the health care system are prompting even more dramatic changes inside medical schools. Next in our series Future Docs, learn how Brown University has adapted, from the man who helped redesign the curriculum.

Listen to the next in our Future Docs series, “Rethinking medical school” here.

For more from the Associate Dean of Brown’s Alpert Medical School, here are the full interviews in two parts.

Part One: How medical school has changed, and what’s prompted reform.

Wesleyan has ended its blanket need-blind admissions policy, saying it can no longer afford to admit every qualified student. Like Brown University, Wesleyan promises financial aid to any student who needs it. For a small number of applicants, that means they will not gain entrance to the college this year because they do not have enough money attend.

Brown will honor its new president, Christina H. Paxson, with an official inauguration ceremony on October 27th. The proceedings will be on the main college green at 2 p.m.

The evening prior to the inauguration, Brown is offering a free night of performances at Veterans Memorial Auditorium. The university says the event will be hosted by actress and Brown alum Kate Burton, and it will include performances by artists from both the Brown and Rhode Island communities.

On this solemn anniversary, an update on the terrible costs of war, including the toll on veterans’ and their families’ lives, from the Brown University-based “Costs of War” project. The ongoing project taps academics of all stripes to tally up the myriad costs of post-9/11 wars in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other locations, from the invisible and previously unaccounted for costs to taxpayers to the vastly under-reported costs in civilian lives, economies, and environments.

Outgoing Brown University President Ruth Simmons will take a seat on the board of trustees at Princeton University next month. Simmons is stepping down on June 30th as head of Brown, ending an 11-year tenure at the Providence institution.

Simmons is no stranger to Princeton. She held several positions at the New Jersey school, including that of vice provost, before becoming president of Smith University. When she became president at Brown University, Simmons was the first African-American to lead an Ivy League school.

Ruth Simmons comes to the end of her tenure at Brown. Photo from Brown University.

Outgoing Brown President Ruth Simmons is preparing her final address to the campus community. She’s slated to speak tomorrow at a baccalaureate ceremony as part of Brown’s graduation weekend.

  • Mitt Romney details his plan for public education, which includes vouchers for parents who want to send their children to private schools.
  • The Feds propose rules for a third round of Race to the Top grants.

Economics has surpassed the biological sciences as the most popular field at Brown University. Roughly 220 members of the undergraduate class of 2012 will receive economics degrees during commencement exercises this weekend.

Biological sciences are the second most popular degree with 200 concentrators, while international relations comes in a distant third.